On September 25, 2017, the Court of Common Pleas of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia County precluded two of plaintiffs’ experts from testifying in the Brandt v. The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., et al. asbestos-related talcum powder case, effectively ending the case. Both Sean Fitzgerald and Dr. Ronald Gordon were precluded from offering expert testimony regarding the asbestos content in the Cashmere Bouquet talcum powder at issue.

The Brandt case involved a plaintiff who claimed she developed mesothelioma as a result of exposure to asbestos from using Cashmere Bouquet talcum powder. Defendants moved, in part, to challenge the opinions of plaintiffs’ experts regarding the asbestos content of Cashmere Bouquet on grounds the experts did not employ generally accepted methodologies to support their opinions.  During the hearing on the defendants’ challenge, the plaintiffs’ experts both conceded the tests they conducted were insufficient to differentiate between asbestos fibers and cleavage fragments—particles that look similar to asbestos fibers. The plaintiffs argued their experts’ methodologies for testing the asbestos content in Cashmere Bouquet were fodder for cross examination, and the case should proceed to the jury.

After four days of testimony from the plaintiffs’ experts and the defendants’ expert, Dr. Matthew Sanchez, the court issued a nine-page memorandum opinion excluding Mr. Fitzgerald’s and Dr. Gordon’s opinions as unreliable, “inherently unscientific,” and not generally accepted pursuant to the Frye test, which Pennsylvania continues to follow.  See Frye v. United States, 293 F. 1013, 1014 (D.C. Cir. 1923). The court painstakingly detailed the experts’ methodologies for determining the alleged asbestos content in Cashmere Bouquet, and concluded that while some of the methodologies employed by Mr. Fitzgerald and Dr. Gordon were generally accepted in the scientific community, each expert modified, varied, or deviated from those generally accepted methodologies, making their opinions unreliable under Frye.

Pennsylvania is one of few states that still apply the Frye “general acceptance” test for determining whether an expert’s opinion is admissible.  The overwhelming majority of states across the country follow the standard set forth in Daubert v. Merrill Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for evaluating admissibility of expert testimony.  Under Daubert, an expert’s testimony must be both relevant and reliable; however, unlike the Frye standard, which uses general acceptance as its cornerstone, Daubert does not require or consider whether the methodologies employed by the expert are generally accepted among the scientific community.

It is difficult to predict whether the methodologies employed by the plaintiff’s experts in the Brandt case would have survived a Daubert challenge.  Both experts conceded that had they followed generally accepted methodologies for testing asbestos in talcum powder, they likely would have been unable to identify asbestos in Cashmere Bouquet, and it is difficult to imagine a jurisdiction where such “inherently unscientific” testimony would be sufficient to submit to a jury.  Nevertheless, jurisdictions following Daubert will not evaluate whether such testing methods are generally accepted in the scientific community. Therefore, it remains to be seen what impact the exclusion of Mr. Fitzgerald’s and Dr. Gordon’s expert
Continue Reading Pennsylvania Frye Test Precludes Two Experts from Testifying in Cashmere Bouquet Talc Case

Mineral talc, as a raw material, was determined to be “inherently safe” by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Maren Nelson in the days leading up to the first Johnson & Johnson California ovarian cancer trial in the Johnson & Johnson Talcum Powder Cases, number JCCP4872.  According to Law360.com, on July 10 the judge dismissed Imerys Talc based on her finding that talc is “inherently safe.”  This ruling could have a profound effect on talc litigation, at least in California, as it may serve to protect Imerys and other suppliers of raw talc from further liability.

The court based its decision on the 1998 California appellate case of Artiglio v. General ElectricSee 61 Cal. App. 4th 830, 839 (1998).  The Artiglio decision is based on the Restatement Third of Torts and stands for the proposition that component and raw material suppliers are not liable to ultimate consumers when the goods or material they supply are: (1) not inherently dangerous; (2) they sell goods or material in bulk to a sophisticated buyer; (3) the material is substantially changed during the manufacturing process; and (4) the supplier has a limited role in developing and designing the end product.  See id.

A number of other states, including Massachusetts, have similar jurisprudence that recognize the “bulk supplier,” “sophisticated user,” and “component part” doctrines which may lead to similar results for raw material suppliers, such as talc suppliers, in ovarian cancer talc litigation.  See Carrel v. Nat’l Cord & Braid Corp., 447 Mass. 431, 441 (2006); Hoffman v. Houghton Chem. Corp., 434 Mass. 624, 629 (2001).

Unlike California courts, though, Massachusetts courts have not conglomerated the sophisticated user doctrine and the bulk supplier doctrine into one rule that deals with “inherently safe” raw materials.  Massachusetts courts have, however, held that the components of the Artiglio rule (the bulk supplier doctrine and the sophisticated user doctrine) are recognized defenses in Massachusetts.  See Hoffman, 434 Mass. at 629; See Artiglio 61 Cal. App. 4th at 839.  Additionally, Massachusetts courts have recognized the component parts doctrine, which in California, is a counterpart of the Artiglio rule. See 61 Cal. App. 4th at 839.  Therefore, talc defendants certainly have a strong argument for dismissal.

Hoffman, confirms that the first component of the Artiglio rule, the bulk supplier doctrine, is available in Massachusetts.  See Hoffman 434 Mass. at 629.  In Hoffman, the pivotal question on appeal concerned the duty of a bulk supplier to warn all foreseeable users of the risks associated with a product’s use.  See id.  In that case, the court held that the bulk supplier doctrine allows a manufacture-supplier of bulk products, in certain circumstances, to discharge its duty to warn end users of a product’s hazards by reasonable reliance on an intermediary.  See id.  Among the factors that may determine reasonable reliance are: (1) the dangerous condition of the product; (2) the purpose for which the product is used; (3) the form of any warnings given; (4) the reliability of
Continue Reading Bulk Supplier, Sophisticated User, and Component Parts Doctrines May Provide Effective Defense to Talc Suppliers Whose Products are “Inherently Safe”