The Florida Asbestos and Silica Fairness and Compensation Act (the “Act”) has governed asbestos litigation in Florida nearly seamlessly for more than a decade until a series of recent challenges threw a wrench into the system by calling into question its constitutionality.

The purpose of the Act, which came into effect in June 2005, is to preserve funds of viable defendants in asbestos litigation to ensure compensation for those who develop or may develop asbestos-related cancers or an actual physical impairment caused by asbestos, and enhance the ability of the judicial system to supervise and control asbestos litigation. See § 774.202. While Defendants will argue the Act has served its purpose, Plaintiffs contend quite the contrary. In three separate motions filed in the Robert G. Clark, et. al. v. Borg Warner Corporation, et. al., Case No. 14-027985, Miami-Dade County, Florida case, Plaintiffs attempt to undo the legislative reform of asbestos litigation in Florida by challenging the constitutionality of the following provisions of the Act: (1) the pleading requirements for establishing an alleged non-malignant asbestos-related physical impairment; (2) the limitations on the liability of sellers and retailers; and (3) the abolition of punitive damages.

In the first of the three motions, Plaintiffs address the provisions of the Act, which govern the pleading requirements applicable to plaintiffs pursuing claims for non-malignant asbestos-related diseases. See Fla. Stat. §§ 774.204(1) and 774.205(2). These provisions require a plaintiff to demonstrate a “physical impairment” by requiring them to file prima facie evidence supporting his/her alleged asbestos-related injury along with their complaint. In Clark, while Plaintiffs provided medical documentation, which they maintain establishes Mr. Clark’s alleged diagnosis of asbestosis, they concede not only that the documentation provided does not meet the requirements of the Act, but also that they will never be able to meet those requirements. As such, they argue that these provisions of the Act should be declared unconstitutional on the following grounds: (1) they are procedural in nature, and therefore violate the separation of powers provision of the Florida Constitution; (2) they restrict access to the Courts; and (3) they violate Plaintiffs’ right to equal protection.

Plaintiffs’ first argument in support of this motion is based on the premise that the Act is procedural in nature, and therefore violates the separation of powers provision of the Florida Constitution, which grants the Florida Supreme Court exclusive authority to enact procedural laws. Plaintiffs look to the Florida Supreme Court’s ruling in Massey v. David, 979 So.2d 931, 936 (Fla. 2008) (citing Allen v. Butterworth, 756 So.2d 52, 59 (Fla. 2000)), which states “[g]enerally, the Legislature is empowered to enact substantive law” and the Florida Supreme Court “has the authority to enact procedural law.” In Massey, the Court described the difference between procedural and substantive law as follows:

Substantive law has been defined as that part of the law which creates, defines, and regulates rights, or that part of the law which courts are established to administer…On the other hand,


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