Raw Hamburger As we reported several weeks ago, there has been a media fueled public outcry against the inclusion of Pink Slime, which is otherwise known as, “lean finely textured beef,” or “LFTB,” in ground beef.  LFTB is comprised of the beef scraps which remain after the valuable cuts of meat are sold.  These pieces of meat are separated from fat through the use of a centrifuge, and treated with ammonium hydroxide to kill harmful bacteria. The result is a safe, edible, high quality beef product containing the same nutritional value as other ground beef.   In fact, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) continues to proclaim that both LFTB and the use of ammonium hydroxide to eliminate bacteria in meat are safe.

Despite the USDA’s continued support for LFTB, the social media led firestorm directed against LFTB has caused a significant backlash against the product.  For example, all but three states which participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), which is administered by the USDA to provide low income school children with a free or reduced cost  lunch, now refuse to purchase ground beef which contains LFTB, despite the fact that it costs three percent less than the alternative. In addition, many restaurants, including McDonalds, and supermarket chains have followed suit and ceased the sale of ground beef which contains LFTB. As a result, many large beef producers have suffered large declines in revenue.  In fact, Beef Products, Inc. (“BPI”), the largest LFTB manufacturer, was forced to close three of its plants and lay off 650 employees.

In an effort to resuscitate their flagging businesses, many beef producers recently submitted requests to the USDA to add labels indicating the inclusion of LFTB. In response, the USDA instituted a voluntary labeling initiative, which many beef manufacturers have already put into practice.   In a further effort to increase transparency and dispute misinformation, BPI has also set up a website, www.beefisbeef.com, which provides valuable factual information about LFTB and the way it is produced.

The impact which the “Pink Slime” phenomenon has had upon the beef industry and the speed with which it developed are staggering.  The sale and consumption of LFTB had been widespread for more than thirty years, with USDA approval. Nevertheless, in a span of a few months, one of the country’s largest industries was derailed through the lightning fast spread of misinformation and misperception.   Perhaps, the lesson to be learned by the food industry is that transparency is the only way to prevent attacks such as those waged against LFTB.
Continue Reading UPDATE: The Pink Slime Backlash

Raw HamburgerNever has the saying, “ignorance is bliss,” been more true than in the context of the ground beef filler known as “pink slime.”  Pink slime, which is known in the food industry as “lean finely textured beef,” or “LFTB,” has been a commonly used ingredient in ground beef for more than two decades.  It is made available to Americans as part of the ground beef they purchase at their local grocery stores and fast food restaurants, and it is fed to children in their school lunches.  Experts estimate that approximately 850 million pounds of LFTB are added to ground beef each year.  LFTB has been dubbed “pink slime,” based on its appearance.  But according to Rich Jochum, corporate administrator for Beef Products, Inc., which took out a full-page advertisement in The Wall Street Journal to defend its product,

“[t]he derogatory term [pink slime] has trumped all science, all facts, all history.”

In fact, LFTB is beef.  LFTB is comprised of beef scraps which are left over from the cow after the valuable cuts of beef are sold. A centrifuge is then used to remove the fat, and ammonium hydroxide gas is applied to kill bacteria.  The resultant product is then added as a filler to ground beef.  This allows meat processors to recover meat that might otherwise be wasted, and saves up to 1.5 million head of cattle from slaughter.  It also leads to leaner ground beef and lower beef prices for consumers.

Until recently, however, most Americans were completely unaware that the ground beef they consumed contained up to fifteen percent LFTB.  That is due to the fact that it is considered a raw material, and thus federal labeling requirements dictate that its inclusion need not be reflected on the label.  Both beef processors and the federal government regulators maintain that there was no reason to label the presence of LFTB in ground beef, and risk consumer confusion, because it is not a separate ingredient.  “It’s beef,” says a USDA official. “There are various parts of the animal that come together in ground beef.  This is just one part.” Moreover, The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) both deem LFTB safe for consumption.  They point to the fact that the product has never been linked to any outbreaks, nor have there been any safety related recalls.

That, however, did not stop the firestorm which quickly swept across this country, fueled by social media, over concerns about the use of ammonium hydroxide and the quality of the meat used in the filler.  The media attention, and the associated response of the American consumer, has led a number of supermarkets to phase out the sale of any ground beef which includes LFTB, and caused a number of school districts to indicate that they will no longer serve ground beef which contains LFTB. This, in turn, has led to an economic disaster for many meat processors, including AFA Foods Inc., which filed for
Continue Reading What is Pink Slime and Why is It in My Burger?