Lady JusticeEver since the United States Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Daimler A.G. v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014), in which the Court held that general personal jurisdiction exists over a corporation only where the corporation is fairly regarded as “at home,” many plaintiffs and state courts have attempted to distinguish Daimler in an effort to expand the boundaries of a court’s exercise of personal jurisdiction. It should come as no surprise then that the U.S. Supreme Court, with five personal jurisdiction cases before it and its Daimler decision seemingly under attack, ultimately decided to grant review of two such cases in 2017: BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell, and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. The Superior Court of San Francisco County, which attack the Daimler holding from very different perspectives.

As you may recall from your first year law school basics, personal jurisdiction requires, among other things, that the “the defendant’s conduct and connection with the forum state are such that he should reasonably anticipate being haled into court there.” World-Wide Volkswagen Corp. v. Woodson, 444 U.S. 286, 297 (1980).  This can be established through either specific jurisdiction, where the defendant has sufficient contacts with the forum state which directly relate to the underlying controversy, or general jurisdiction, where “the [ defendant’s] affiliations with the [forum s]tate are so ‘continuous and systematic’ as to render them essentially at home in the forum [s]tate.” Daimler, 134 S. Ct. at 748-49, 760.

BNSF Railway, begs the question as to whether a state court may decline to follow the Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler, as The Montana Supreme Court directly challenged the limitations on general personal jurisdiction established by the Daimler Court. It did so by holding that the Federal Employers Liability Act (“FELA”) essentially creates an exception to the “at home” requirements of Daimler.  The plaintiffs in BNSF Railway are two employees who seek damages from the company pursuant to FELA, which provides railroad employees with a federal cause of action for personal injuries caused by their employer’s negligence. Neither plaintiff resides in Montana, nor did the injuries occur in Montana. Yet, plaintiffs brought suit in Montana. Under Daimler, BNSF should not have been considered “at home” in Montana, as it is incorporated in Delaware and has its principal place of business in Texas. Despite these facts, the Montana Supreme Court held that Montana courts could exercise general jurisdiction over BNSF.  The Montana Supreme Court reasoned that Section 56 of FELA allows a plaintiff to bring suit in any federal district court in which the defendant does business, and also confers concurrent jurisdiction over FELA suits to state courts. As such, the Court reasoned that state courts should have general jurisdiction in FELA matters over defendants in any state in which the defendant did business.  Tyrrell v. BNSF Ry. Co., 373 P.3d 1 (Mont. 2016).

As previously reported, in Bristol-Myers Squibb the California Supreme Court took a different approach to challenging the limits of the exercise of personal jurisdiction. 
Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court to Weigh In on Personal Jurisdiction as State Courts Have Gone Rogue

California Supreme Court
California Supreme Court

The United States Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler A.G. v. Bauman, 571 U.S. __, 134 S.Ct. 746 (2014), has played a significant role this year in cases pending in Delaware and Rhode Island. Most recently, the California Supreme Court has weighed in, changing what we thought we knew about personal jurisdiction, at least in California.

In Daimler, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a court can exercise general jurisdiction (whereby a state court asserts jurisdiction over a defendant on claims unrelated to the defendant’s activities in the forum state) only when the defendant can be said to be “at home” in the forum – the paradigm being the state in which it is incorporated or has its principal place of business. The California Supreme Court has now found a way to turn that decision on its head. It held in Bristol-Meyers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court, 377 P.3d 874 (Cal. 2016) that plaintiffs from outside California whose claims do not arise out of anything involving California can sue a non-California defendant in a California court.

Bristol-Myers argued, pursuant to Daimler, that it was not subject to personal jurisdiction in the California courts for the suits of 592 non-California plaintiffs. First of all, it argued that it was not subject to specific personal jurisdiction because none of the 592 lawsuits by non-California plaintiffs arose out of anything plaintiff or defendant did in California. Moreover, it argued that it was not subject to general personal jurisdiction because it was not “at home” in California, based on the fact that it was neither headquartered nor incorporated in California.

The California Supreme Court agreed that there was no basis for the exercise of general jurisdiction, but instead found that a “new wave” specific jurisdiction existed because Bristol-Myers engaged in “nationwide marketing, promotion and distribution [that] created a substantial nexus between the non-resident plaintiffs’ claims and the company’s contacts in California . . . .” And, according to the Bristol-Meyers court, the more wide-ranging the defendant’s forum contacts, the more readily a “connection” between the defendant’s forum contacts and the claims by the non-resident plaintiffs can be found.

This decision of the California Supreme Court appears to basically moot the Daimler decision and may make any company that does business nationally subject to personal jurisdiction in California. Bristol-Meyers has filed a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court, so this decision may have a short shelf life. For the time being, however, companies should be prepared to litigate in California, as the Bristol-Meyers decision is likely to factor into plaintiffs’ decision when choosing a forum in which to litigate.
Continue Reading CA Supreme Court Offers Interpretation of Personal Jurisdiction Decision

Inland_cat_sailboatThe rules of civil procedure are thrust, like harpoons, upon young lawyers during their first year of law school, and for good reason.  Failing to abide by any number of a jurisdiction’s various rules sections, subsections, and clauses can result in instant death to your client’s cause of action or defense.  For example, we know that under Rule 12(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, motions asserting the defense of personal jurisdiction must be made before filing a responsive pleading, and can be deemed waived if not raised in such a motion or the responsive pleading itself.

Though there are various exceptions to the time-to-plead rules, the importance of getting a personal jurisdiction challenge front and center before the court early on in the litigation process applies to most jurisdictions, and a failure to do so can undermine the defense altogether.  A defendant learned this lesson the hard way in a recent case before the Rhode Island State Supreme Court.

In Pullar v. Cappelli, No. 2015-303 (R.I. 2016), the plaintiff (and former Rhode Island resident) met the defendant (a New York resident) in New York to negotiate a contract for employment, in which the plaintiff was to serve as captain of the defendant’s sailboat for a term of three years, with an annual salary and promise of bonus amounting to one year’s salary at the conclusion of the contract.  One month before the contract was set to expire, the defendant terminated the plaintiff’s employment without cause, denying the skipper his bonus.  The plaintiff subsequently filed suit for breach of contract to recover the money owed him.

In his initial answer, the defendant asserted that the subject venue, Rhode Island, did not have personal jurisdiction over him.  Nevertheless, the case proceeded for the next three years, through virtually all stages of litigation.  The defendant served written discovery, took the plaintiff’s deposition, filed discovery motions with the court, participated in court-annexed arbitration, rejected the arbitration award, and requested a trial assignment.  After the case was assigned for trial, and more than one year after the conclusion of arbitration, the defendant moved for summary judgment, asserting a lack of in personam jurisdiction.

On appeal after the trial court granted the defendant’s motion, the Rhode Island Supreme Court did not waste any breathe analyzing whether the defendant had minimum contacts with the state to satisfy the jurisdictional requirements of the long arm statute.  Recognizing that the defendant properly preserved the jurisdictional defense by raising it in his answer, the Court rejected the notion “that preservation of the defense is inviolable simply because it was raised in the answer.”  Relying on the analogous Rule 12 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and interpretive case law, the Court concluded that simply asserting a jurisdictional defect in an answer does not preserve the right to raise the defense indefinitely.  Adopting the forfeiture doctrine developed by the federal court, the Supreme Court held that the defendant’s conduct prior to asserting his jurisdictional defense gave the
Continue Reading Don’t Watch Your Personal Jurisdiction Defense Sail Away

Lady JusticeOn October 13, 2016, Presiding Justice Alice B. Gibney of the Rhode Island Superior Court ruled on Defendant Dana Companies, LLC’s Motion to Dismiss for Lack of Personal Jurisdiction pending in the case of Harold Wayne Murray and Janice M. Murray v. 3M Company, et al., granting the defendant’s motion to dismiss upon finding that the court lacked sufficient minimum contacts to exercise personal jurisdiction – either general or specific – over the defendant. With this ruling, Rhode Island joins a growing list of jurisdictions that have applied the United States Supreme Court’s standard passed down in Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014).

The Murray case was filed in Providence Superior Court, and involves a Tennessee resident alleging he developed mesothelioma as a result of exposure to asbestos through his work with and around numerous defendants’ products over the course of his lifetime, predominantly at locations in Tennessee and Virginia. The complaint filed in Murray named hundreds of defendants who allegedly manufactured, sold, or supplied asbestos or asbestos-containing products to which Mr. Murray was allegedly exposed, including Dana Companies, LLC (“Dana”). Dana subsequently moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s claims on the grounds that a Rhode Island court’s exercise of jurisdiction, either specific or general, would violate its due process rights pursuant to the United State Constitution as well as the Supreme Court’s ruling in Daimler AG v. Bauman and its progeny.

Specifically, Dana asserted that as the plaintiff’s claims arose from alleged conduct that occurred entirely outside of Rhode Island with consequences transpiring outside of the State, the court’s exercise of specific personal jurisdiction was clearly improper. During his deposition taken near his home in Johnson City, Tennessee, Mr. Murray confirmed that he’d never lived in, worked in, received treatment in, or visited the State of Rhode Island. Absent a nexus between the plaintiff, the forum, and the litigation to permit the court’s exercise of specific personal jurisdiction, the court’s review of Dana’s motion to dismiss turned on the question of whether there was a basis to exert general jurisdiction over the defendant.

The court’s general jurisdiction analysis began by citing the Supreme Court’s decision in Goodyear Dunlop Tires Operations, S.A. v. Brown for the proposition that a court may reasonably exercise general jurisdiction over a foreign corporation where the corporation’s affiliations with the state are so continuous and systematic as to render them essentially “at home” in the forum state. 564 U.S. 915, 919 (2011); Int’l Shoe Co. v. State of Wash., Office of Unemployment Comp. and Placement, 326 U.S. 310, 317 (1945)).Upholding Daimler’s elaboration of this “at home” standard, the court reasoned that “with very limited exceptions, a defendant can customarily be subject to general jurisdiction in the state of its incorporation and the state of its principal place of business.” Going further, the court specified that evidence of a corporation’s continuous and systematic contact with a jurisdiction was relevant only to the determination of specific jurisdiction, and was not the


Continue Reading Rhode Island Court Upholds Daimler to Dismiss Claims Against Foreign Corporation for Lack of Personal Jurisdiction