The Florida Asbestos and Silica Fairness and Compensation Act (the “Act”) has governed asbestos litigation in Florida nearly seamlessly for more than a decade until a series of recent challenges threw a wrench into the system by calling into question its constitutionality.

The purpose of the Act, which came into effect in June 2005, is to preserve funds of viable defendants in asbestos litigation to ensure compensation for those who develop or may develop asbestos-related cancers or an actual physical impairment caused by asbestos, and enhance the ability of the judicial system to supervise and control asbestos litigation. See § 774.202. While Defendants will argue the Act has served its purpose, Plaintiffs contend quite the contrary. In three separate motions filed in the Robert G. Clark, et. al. v. Borg Warner Corporation, et. al., Case No. 14-027985, Miami-Dade County, Florida case, Plaintiffs attempt to undo the legislative reform of asbestos litigation in Florida by challenging the constitutionality of the following provisions of the Act: (1) the pleading requirements for establishing an alleged non-malignant asbestos-related physical impairment; (2) the limitations on the liability of sellers and retailers; and (3) the abolition of punitive damages.

In the first of the three motions, Plaintiffs address the provisions of the Act, which govern the pleading requirements applicable to plaintiffs pursuing claims for non-malignant asbestos-related diseases. See Fla. Stat. §§ 774.204(1) and 774.205(2). These provisions require a plaintiff to demonstrate a “physical impairment” by requiring them to file prima facie evidence supporting his/her alleged asbestos-related injury along with their complaint. In Clark, while Plaintiffs provided medical documentation, which they maintain establishes Mr. Clark’s alleged diagnosis of asbestosis, they concede not only that the documentation provided does not meet the requirements of the Act, but also that they will never be able to meet those requirements. As such, they argue that these provisions of the Act should be declared unconstitutional on the following grounds: (1) they are procedural in nature, and therefore violate the separation of powers provision of the Florida Constitution; (2) they restrict access to the Courts; and (3) they violate Plaintiffs’ right to equal protection.

Plaintiffs’ first argument in support of this motion is based on the premise that the Act is procedural in nature, and therefore violates the separation of powers provision of the Florida Constitution, which grants the Florida Supreme Court exclusive authority to enact procedural laws. Plaintiffs look to the Florida Supreme Court’s ruling in Massey v. David, 979 So.2d 931, 936 (Fla. 2008) (citing Allen v. Butterworth, 756 So.2d 52, 59 (Fla. 2000)), which states “[g]enerally, the Legislature is empowered to enact substantive law” and the Florida Supreme Court “has the authority to enact procedural law.” In Massey, the Court described the difference between procedural and substantive law as follows:

Substantive law has been defined as that part of the law which creates, defines, and regulates rights, or that part of the law which courts are established to administer…On the other hand,


Continue Reading Florida Plaintiffs Challenge the Constitutionality of Florida’s Asbestos and Silica Fairness and Compensation Act

In a 2-1 opinion, the Fourth District Court of Appeal continued to apply the law which bars marrying into a cause of action, but a strong dissenting opinion and noted public policy concerns could trigger further review.

In Florida, as in various other jurisdictions, the courts follow the common law marriage before injury rule. This rule requires a party to be married to the injured person prior to the time of the injury in order to assert a claim for loss of consortium – i.e. loss of companionship and support. The rationale behind this rule is that a person should be unable to marry into a cause of action. This rule has been consistently applied in personal injury cases including toxic tort and products liability cases of the “creeping” variety, such as asbestos and tobacco.

In the recent decision issued in Janis Kelly v. Georgia-Pacific, LLC, et al., No. 4D15-4666 (Fla. 4th DCA February 22, 2017) the Court was asked to look at this issue in the context of a wrongful death claim. In Kelly, Plaintiffs originally filed a personal injury claim asserting causes of action for negligence, strict liability, and for Mrs. Kelly’s loss of consortium arising from Mr. Kelly’s alleged exposure to asbestos while working in construction from 1973 to 1974. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were not married until 1976, two years after Mr. Kelly’s alleged asbestos exposure. Mr. Kelly died during the course of the litigation at which time Mrs. Kelly amended the complaint to allege a claim for wrongful death, which included a demand for loss of consortium damages. The Defendants moved to dismiss Mrs. Kelly’s claims for loss of consortium as Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were not married at the time of Mr. Kelly’s alleged injury. When the trial court granted the motion to dismiss, Plaintiff voluntarily dismissed the remaining claims and the appeal followed.

On appeal, the Court addressed whether the Florida Wrongful Death Act supersedes the common law requirement that a spouse must be married to the decedent before the time of the injury to recover consortium damages. And, the Court revisited the question of whether the common-law marriage before injury rule should apply in “creeping” cases where the injury is a latent injury that does not reveal itself until after the parties marry.

On the first issue, the Court looked to the legislative intent of Florida’s Wrongful Death Act, to determine if the Act supersedes the common law of loss of consortium– i.e. did the statute unequivocally state that it changes the common law or is it so repugnant to the common law that the two cannot coexist. Thornber v. City of Fort Walton Beach, 568 So.2d 914, 918 (Fla. 1990). In applying Thornber, the Court found that the plain language of the Act clearly intended to allow for the survivors of the decedent to recover damages, including the surviving spouse to recover “consortium-type” damages. See ACandS, Inc. v. Redd, 703 So.2d 494 (Fla. 3d DCA 1007). The Court found,
Continue Reading Recent Appellate Court Ruling Extends the Application of the Common Law Marriage Before Injury Rule to Apply in Florida’s Wrongful Death Claims