According to the Supreme Court of Illinois, merely conducting business within that state is insufficient to satisfy the standards for personal jurisdiction established by the U.S. Supreme Court in Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014).  The Illinois Supreme Court recently explored that issue in Aspen American Insurance Company v. Interstate Warehousing, Inc., where a plaintiff headquarted in Indiana attempted to bring an action in Illinois for damages allegedly caused by the collapse of a warehouse in Michigan.  Plaintiff Aspen brought a subrogation action in Cook County, Illinois seeking to recover damages allegedly caused by the collapse of a warehouse near Grand Rapids, Michigan, which was owned by Defendant Interstate Warehousing. The Defendant, which is headquartered in Indiana, operates eight warehouses across the country, one of which is in Joliet, Illinois.

In its pleadings, the Plaintiff sought to rely upon the Defendant’s Joliet warehouse to establish personal jurisdiction in Illinois. In its motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction, the Defendant did not dispute that it was doing business in Illinois. Instead, the Defendant argued that the business it was conducting in Illinois was insufficient to subject it to general personal jurisdiction under the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler AG v. Bauman. Relying on Daimler, the Defendant explained that the Plaintiff failed to establish that the Defendant was either domiciled or “at home” in Illinois. The circuit court disagreed, and denied the Defendant’s motion. A divided appellate court affirmed the dismissal denial of the motion to dismiss.

                                                                                                                                                                                   

Writing on behalf of a unanimous Court, Justice Burke reversed the lower court decisions, holding that the Plaintiff failed to make a prima facie showing that the Defendant was “essentially at home” in Illinois, as required by Daimler. More specifically, the Court determined that the Plaintiff’s burden was to show that the Defendant was incorporated or had its principal place of business in Illinois, or in the alternative, that the Defendant’s contacts with Illinois were so substantial that an exception was warranted. In making its determination, the Court looked at Perkins v. Benguet Consolidated Mining Co., 342 U.S. 437 (1952), in which the defendant, a Philippines company, was forced to relocate from the Philippines to Ohio during World War II. In that case, the Supreme Court found that Ohio was “the center of the corporation’s wartime activities” and, effectively, a “surrogate for the place of incorporation or head office.” Perkins, 342 U.S. at 448.

In the Aspen case, the Defendant Interstate Warehousing was an Indiana corporation with its principal place of business in Indiana, which was registered to conduct business in Illinois and employed the general manager of a warehouse in Joliet. The Plaintiff pointed both to the Defendant’s registration with the Illinois Secretary of State and the business it carried out at its Joliet warehouse as establishing jurisdiction; however, the Illinois Supreme Court ultimately concluded that those facts were insufficient either to render the Defendant at home in the state or to
Continue Reading Conducting Business in Illinois May Be Insufficient to Establish Personal Jurisdiction

supreme-court-building-1209701_1280With the United States Supreme Court hearing less than 100 cases every year, it is exceedingly rare for the Court to address a particular issue more than once.  However, with state courts throughout the country failing to properly apply its 2014 decision in Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S.Ct. 746 (“Daimler”), the Supreme Court recently found it necessary to reaffirm that absent “exceptional” circumstances a foreign corporate defendant is subject to general personal jurisdiction only in its state of incorporation or principal place of business.  Specifically, in BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell, 581 U.S. __ (May 30, 2017) (“Tyrrell”), the Supreme Court held that Montana state courts could not exercise general personal jurisdiction over defendant BNSF, despite the fact that BNSF had fairly significant business ties to the state, because BNSF was neither incorporated in Montana nor had its principal place of business within the state.  While Daimler and Tyrrell will not eliminate the practice of forum shopping by plaintiffs, they do place material limitations on a plaintiff’s ability to file litigation in any forum where the injury did not occur and plaintiff must therefore rely on general personal jurisdiction alone in establishing personal jurisdiction over a foreign corporate defendant.

Background

Tyrrell involves two initially independent cases brought in Montana state courts by plaintiffs (Tyrrell and Nelson) under the Federal Employers’ Liability Act (“FELA”), 45 U.S.C. §51 et seq., which allows railroad employees to sue their employers for injuries sustained on the job.  Both plaintiffs brought suit in Montana state courts, but neither case involved an injury that occurred in the state, and neither plaintiff resided in the state.  While defendant BNSF is incorporated in Delaware with its headquarters in Texas, it does have significant business ties to Montana, where 5% of its work force is located and roughly 6% of its railroad track is contained.  BNSF filed a motion to dismiss in each lawsuit, asserting that pursuant to Daimler it was not “at home” in Montana, and therefore not subject to general personal jurisdiction.  Because the injuries giving rise to the causes of action did not occur in Montana, specific personal jurisdiction was not at issue.  In Nelson’s case the motion was granted, but in Tyrrell’s case the motion was denied.  The rulings were appealed, and on appeal the Montana Supreme Court consolidated the two matters.

The Montana Supreme Court found that the state courts had general personal jurisdiction over BNSF under FELA because BNSF was doing business in Montana at the time of the suit.  In finding personal jurisdiction over BNSF, the Montana Supreme Court distinguished the Supreme Court’s holding in Daimler based on the application of FELA, concluding that because of the federal statute general personal jurisdiction could be conferred to the state courts even if the Daimler test was not satisfied.  The Montana Supreme Court also found that Montana state law allows for the state courts to exercise personal jurisdiction over BNSF because BNSF conducts business in the state. 
Continue Reading Supreme Court Reaffirms Limits on General Personal Jurisdiction For Foreign Corporate Defendants

lawjUSTICEBWIn its recent decision in Williams v. Yamaha Motor Co., 851 F.3d 1015 (9th Cir. 2017), the Ninth Circuit affirmed dismissal against a Japanese manufacturer because it was not “at home” in the forum. This consistent application of Daimler provides the benefit of predictable results.

In 2013, George Williams filed suit, on behalf of himself and others similar situated, against Yamaha Motor Co. Ltd (“YMC”), a Japanese corporation, and Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. (“YMUS”), YMC’s wholly-owned subsidiary. Those plaintiffs were purchasers of outboard motors, which were designed and manufactured by YMC, then, marketed and imported in California by YMUS. Despite being properly serviced and maintained, the motors failed after 500 to 700 hours of use, far less than the expected motor life of 2,000 hours. Williams alleged that YMC had knowledge of the defect, but failed to remedy the issue because the defect did not typically manifest until after the three-year warranty period expired.

After multiple amendments to the initial complaint, the district court dismissed Williams’ only remaining claim, granting YMC’s motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction and YMUS’s motion to dismiss pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(b)(6). Williams appealed and the Ninth Circuit affirmed the dismissal, finding that the district court lacked general jurisdiction of YMC and that Williams failed to adequately plead the elements of his claim against YMUS.

The Ninth Circuit relied on Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014) in reviewing the jurisdiction issue. The court stated that the analysis for general jurisdiction is whether “corporation is essentially ‘at home’ in the forum state.” The court applied this analysis and expressly considered the following facts: Japan was YMC’s principal place of business; YMC had no offices or employees in California; and YMC’s total sales in North America made up only 17% of YMC’s total net sales. Accordingly, the Ninth Circuit was persuaded that YMC was not “at home” in California.

The Ninth Circuit acknowledged that its decisions after Daimler applied the alternative “alter ego test for ‘imputed’ general jurisdiction.” Under this theory, a foreign company would need to be so intertwined with its subsidiary that neither would have a separate identity and would merely function as alter egos of each other. However, even under this theory, the Ninth Circuit found no facts regarding the “nature of the parent-subsidiary relationship. “ Accordingly, the court declined to find support for the “alter ego” theory of jurisdiction.

This case is another example of a post-Daimler court strictly following the “at home” rule of general jurisdiction over a foreign business. Some argue that Daimler’s “at home” rule is inconsistent with historical trends and serves to “shrink the jurisdiction” where suits may be brought against corporations.[1] However, these concerns are outweighed by the benefits of a clear and predictable alternative to the previous “minimum [or substantial] contacts” analysis set forth by International Shoe and its progeny.

The “at home” rule is a straightforward analysis as compared to the previous analysis.
Continue Reading Williams v. Yamaha Motor Co.: No Jurisdiction over a Foreign Company

supreme-court-building-1209701_1280 On February 28, 2017, the Missouri Supreme Court joined a growing list of tribunals to apply a strict reading of the United States Supreme Court’s seminal ruling in Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014). In State ex rel. Norfolk So. Ry. Co. v. Hon. Colleen Dolan, No. SC95514, the Missouri Supreme Court held that Missouri courts lack the requisite personal jurisdiction, either specific or general, over a non-resident defendant, Norfolk Southern Railway Company, in a claim brought by a non-resident plaintiff who asserted a Federal Employer’s Liability Act (FELA) violation arising from his employment by Norfolk Southern in the State of Indiana. The ruling marks a significant victory for corporate defendants seeking to combat forum shopping by plaintiffs, the practice of bringing cases in jurisdictions which are more likely to provide a favorable judgment or a more lucrative verdict.

The plaintiff, Indiana resident Russell Parker, argued that Missouri courts had both general and specific jurisdiction over Norfolk based on the company’s contacts with the state. Specifically, the plaintiff cited Norfolk’s ownership of approximately 400 miles of railroad track in the state, 590 employees in the state, and approximately $232,000,000 in annual revenue from the company’s operations in Missouri. As grounds for its decision, the court found that the plaintiff’s allegations did not arise from or relate to Norfolk’s activities in Missouri so as to give rise to specific jurisdiction, nor were Norfolk’s operations in the State sufficient to give rise to a Missouri court’s exercise of general jurisdiction over a defendant such as Norfolk; a company incorporated in and with principal place of business in Virginia.

Citing the Second Circuit’s decision in Brown v. Lockheed Martin Corp., 814 F.3d 619, 627-30 (2d Cir. 2016), wherein .05 percent of the defendant’s employees and no more than .107 percent of total revenue were derived from the defendant’s activities in the state of Connecticut, the Missouri Supreme Court concluded that Norfolk’s activity in Missouri represents “a tiny portion” of the company’s business activities nationwide. Specifically, the court noted that the revenue derived from Missouri is approximately 2 percent of Norfolk’s total revenues; the tracks owned and operated in Missouri constitute approximately 2 percent of the tracks Norfolk owns and operates nationally; and the company’s Missouri-based employees account for only about 2 percent of its total employees.

The Missouri Supreme Court’s decision is particularly newsworthy for its refusal to find general personal jurisdiction based on a non-resident company’s appointment of a registered agent in the state. In its ruling, the court rejected the plaintiff’s argument that Norfolk’s compliance with Missouri’s mandatory business registration requirements for foreign corporations amounted to consent to the exercise of general personal jurisdiction by Missouri courts. To the contrary, the court held that as the relevant section of law provided only that registration is consent to service of process against non-resident corporations, “the registration statute does not provide an independent basis for broadening Missouri’s personal jurisdiction to include suits unrelated
Continue Reading Missouri Supreme Court Extends Daimler and Says No to Forum Shopping

Lady JusticeEver since the United States Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Daimler A.G. v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014), in which the Court held that general personal jurisdiction exists over a corporation only where the corporation is fairly regarded as “at home,” many plaintiffs and state courts have attempted to distinguish Daimler in an effort to expand the boundaries of a court’s exercise of personal jurisdiction. It should come as no surprise then that the U.S. Supreme Court, with five personal jurisdiction cases before it and its Daimler decision seemingly under attack, ultimately decided to grant review of two such cases in 2017: BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell, and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. The Superior Court of San Francisco County, which attack the Daimler holding from very different perspectives.

As you may recall from your first year law school basics, personal jurisdiction requires, among other things, that the “the defendant’s conduct and connection with the forum state are such that he should reasonably anticipate being haled into court there.” World-Wide Volkswagen Corp. v. Woodson, 444 U.S. 286, 297 (1980).  This can be established through either specific jurisdiction, where the defendant has sufficient contacts with the forum state which directly relate to the underlying controversy, or general jurisdiction, where “the [ defendant’s] affiliations with the [forum s]tate are so ‘continuous and systematic’ as to render them essentially at home in the forum [s]tate.” Daimler, 134 S. Ct. at 748-49, 760.

BNSF Railway, begs the question as to whether a state court may decline to follow the Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler, as The Montana Supreme Court directly challenged the limitations on general personal jurisdiction established by the Daimler Court. It did so by holding that the Federal Employers Liability Act (“FELA”) essentially creates an exception to the “at home” requirements of Daimler.  The plaintiffs in BNSF Railway are two employees who seek damages from the company pursuant to FELA, which provides railroad employees with a federal cause of action for personal injuries caused by their employer’s negligence. Neither plaintiff resides in Montana, nor did the injuries occur in Montana. Yet, plaintiffs brought suit in Montana. Under Daimler, BNSF should not have been considered “at home” in Montana, as it is incorporated in Delaware and has its principal place of business in Texas. Despite these facts, the Montana Supreme Court held that Montana courts could exercise general jurisdiction over BNSF.  The Montana Supreme Court reasoned that Section 56 of FELA allows a plaintiff to bring suit in any federal district court in which the defendant does business, and also confers concurrent jurisdiction over FELA suits to state courts. As such, the Court reasoned that state courts should have general jurisdiction in FELA matters over defendants in any state in which the defendant did business.  Tyrrell v. BNSF Ry. Co., 373 P.3d 1 (Mont. 2016).

As previously reported, in Bristol-Myers Squibb the California Supreme Court took a different approach to challenging the limits of the exercise of personal jurisdiction. 
Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court to Weigh In on Personal Jurisdiction as State Courts Have Gone Rogue