district court
Washington, D.C. District Court of Appeals

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals recently adopted the standards found in Federal Rule of Evidence 702 (“Rule 702”), regarding the admissibility of testimony by expert witnesses, thereby replacing the Frye (“Frye”) test.  See Motorola Inc., et al. v. Michael Patrick Murray, et al., 2016 WL 6134870 (October 20, 2016)(“Motorola”). Washington D.C. is now the most recent jurisdiction to adopt Rule 702, a trend that has continued since Rule 702 was amended in 2000 to reflect United States Supreme Court decisions pertaining to expert witness testimony, such as Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993); Kumho Tire Co. v. Carmichael, 526 U.S. 137 (1999); and General Electric v. Joiner, 522 U.S. 136 (1997).

Rule 702 provides:

A witness who is qualified as an expert by knowledge, skill, experience, training, or education may testify in the form of an opinion or otherwise if:

  1. the expert’s scientific, technical, or other specialized knowledge will help the trier of fact to understand the evidence or to determine a fact in issue;
  2. the testimony is based on sufficient facts or data;
  3. the testimony is the product of reliable principles and methods; and
  4. the expert has reliably applied the principles and methods to the facts of the case.

In Motorola Plaintiffs in thirteen cases sued numerous cell phone manufacturers, service providers, and trade associations, alleging that long-term exposure to cell-phone radiation caused their brain tumors. The trial Judge Frederick H. Weisberg, held four weeks of evidentiary hearings on the admissibility of the expert testimony offered by the plaintiffs. He concluded that, based on the record before him, some, but not all, of Plaintiffs’ proffered expert testimony on general causation was admissible under the Frye evidentiary standard, but “most, if not all, of Plaintiffs’ experts would probably be excluded under the Rule 702/Daubert standard.” Judge Weisberg then certified the following question of law to the Circuit Court: “whether the District of Columbia should adopt Federal Rule of Evidence 702 (or a revised Frye standard) for the admissibility of expert evidence.”

In certifying the question, Judge Weisberg noted,

[A]t the risk of over-simplification[,] if a reliable, but not yet generally accepted, methodology produces ‘good science,’ Daubert will let it in, and if an accepted methodology produces ‘bad science,’ Daubert will keep it out; conversely, under Frye, as applied in this jurisdiction, even if a new methodology produces ‘good science,’ it will usually be excluded, but if an accepted methodology produces ‘bad science,’ it is likely to be admitted.

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals, en banc., heard the question, Plaintiffs’ appeal, and adopted the Rule 702 standards unanimously, with Judge Easterly providing a concurring opinion.

Associate Judge Fisher, writing for the Court, stated, “the ability to focus on the reliability of principles and methods, and their application, is a decided advantage that will lead to better decision-making by juries and trial judges
Continue Reading D.C. Court of Appeals Overturns Frye and Adopts Federal Rule of Evidence Rule 702