In a recent case, a Rhode Island Jury awarded $31.3 million to Brett and Stacie Smith after a 2014 swimming accident in a pond at the University of Rhode Island left Mr. Smith paralyzed from the chest down.  The jury found that the University of Rhode Island was negligent in its failure to post warning signs and to inform its guests that swimming was prohibited.

The Smiths were attending a wedding during the weekend of July 25, 2014, at the Whispering Pines Conference Center.  After the rehearsal dinner, several members of the wedding party decided to go swimming in Louttit Pond.  After twenty or so minutes in the water, Mr. Smith and some others swam to, and climbed atop, a large rock in the middle of the pond.  They dove off and began to swim away from the rock.  While swimming underwater, Mr. Smith struck his head on a submerged rock, causing his paralysis.

The case focused on whether the defendants owed Mr. Smith a duty of care.  The plaintiffs argued that a duty existed for the defendants to post warning signs indicating that swimming was not allowed or describing the potential danger.  Conversely, the defendants argued that no duty existed as Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries and that the potential dangers were open and obvious.

At trial, the major issue primarily focused on whether it was reasonably foreseeable that individuals would swim and be injured in the subject pond.  The plaintiffs put forth evidence that the management of the property had outlawed swimming in the pond due to potentially dangerous conditions, but did not install signs that forbade swimming on the property or warned of the dangers that the pond possessed.   The plaintiffs argued that this failure constituted negligence, as it was foreseeable that: 1) people would swim in the pond; 2) the very nature of the property lent itself to swimming as it promoted access to the outdoors, specifically, the water as well as numerous outdoor activities; and 3) the pond had a dock and a canoe launching point which encouraged people to use the water.

The defendants asserted two main defenses: 1) Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries; 2) the condition was open and obvious. In Rhode Island, assumption of the risk is an affirmative defense that absolves a defendant of liability regardless of the defendant’s own negligence.  Loffredo v. Merrimack Mutual Fire Ins. Co., 669 A.2d 1162 (R.I. 1996).  To prevail on the assumption of the risk defense, defendants need to show that a plaintiff voluntarily encountered an unreasonable risk and appreciated its unreasonable character.  Id.  In examining this subjective standard, one must look at what the particular plaintiff saw, knew, understood, and appreciated.  Id.  As for the open-and-obvious defense, a property owner in Rhode Island is not liable for injuries that a guest suffered while on an owner’s premises when that guest was engaging in an open and obvious danger. Bucki v. Hawkins, 914
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Overview

On March 30, 2018, Judge Rya Zobel of the United States District Court (District of Massachusetts) issued a memorandum of decision on two Defendants’ (NSTAR Electric, formerly Boston Edison, and General Electric) Motions for Summary Judgment in an asbestos personal injury and wrongful death matter, June Stearns and Clifford Stearns as Co-Executors of the Estate of Wayne Oliver v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., et al., that addresses multiple issues, including statute of repose, strict liability and liability of a premises owner.

Background

Plaintiff’s decedent, Wayne Oliver, worked on the construction of two power plants, Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Massachusetts) and Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Maryland), between 1971 and 1978 and his estate alleges that Mr. Oliver was exposed to asbestos-containing products present at those sites. Defendant NSTAR Electric (formerly Boston Edison)(“Boston Edison”) owned the Pilgrim premises.  Defendant General Electric (“GE”) allegedly designed, manufactured, and sold generators used at Pilgrim and at Calvert Cliffs.  Oliver worked as a pipe inspector for Bechtel, the architect-engineer on projects at both Pilgrim and Calvert Cliffs.

As the owner of Pilgrim, Boston Edison conducted safety audits while the construction proceeded, but primary responsibility for the site construction rested with GE and Bechtel: GE for the steam supply system, nuclear fuel system, and the generators themselves; and Bechtel for everything else. In that capacity, Bechtel hired and supervised all subcontractors on the project, including an insulation installer, New England Insulation (“NEI”). Although NEI reported to Bechtel, it installed the asbestos-containing insulation around the generators pursuant to directions from both Bechtel and GE, and pursuant to GE’s specifications that specifically required asbestos-containing insulation.  The Court also recognized that at both Pilgrim and at Calvert Cliffs, GE had rejected suggestions or proposals for an asbestos-free insulation alternative.

Oliver allegedly sustained exposure to asbestos at both sites while inspecting pipe near dusty thermal insulation as other subcontractors installed it around the generators. He was subsequently diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2015 and died in 2016.  In denying summary judgment to GE and granting summary judgment to Boston Edison, the Court found that:  (1) while the construction work performed by GE met the definition of an improvement to real property for purposes of the statute of repose, public policy considerations necessitated an exception to the application of the statute in cases involving alleged asbestos-related disease; (2) the installation of asbestos insulation was not an abnormally dangerous activity; (3) Boston Edison did not exercise sufficient control over the work at issue to be held negligent; and (4) a premises owner, such as Boston Edison, has no duty to warn where the subcontractor has knowledge of the hazard which is equal to or greater than that of the premises owner.

Application of Statute of Repose

GE argued protection from Plaintiffs’ claims under Massachusetts’s six-year statute of repose, which bars claims concerning “improvements to real property.” Under Massachusetts law, this involves a “permanent addition” versus “ordinary repair.” Whether this statute applied to asbestos claims against manufacturers posed an
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On August 30, 2016, a Miami-Dade jury awarded Richard Batchelor and his wife more than $21 million after finding that his mesothelioma arose, in part, from asbestos exposure during overhaul work at a Florida Power & Light Co. (FP+L) power plant. On December 27, 2017, the Third District Court of Appeal erased the verdict against defendant Bechtel Corporation (Bechtel), finding that the jury should never have considered claims against that defendant because of plaintiffs’ insufficient evidence.  The appellate court also found reversible error in an adverse inference instruction, and concluded that Bechtel’s efforts to locate discoverable information were reasonable under the circumstances.

Between 1974 and 1980, Richard Batchelor worked for FP&L as an electrical technician at two power plants including the Turkey Point power plants. At that time, Turkey Point was a sprawling and complex facility – occupying over three thousand acres and containing 12 nuclear-fueled units and two oil and natural gas fueled units – and provided power for all of South Florida. On any given day, four hundred FP&L employees and numerous contractors worked at Turkey Point. Mr. Batchelor was responsible for repairing and maintaining gauges and equipment at the site, including four of the nuclear and gas units. Insulation, an indeterminate amount of which contained asbestos, covered the various pipes, wires, and equipment at the plant. Mr. Batchelor never removed insulation from any equipment and never worked on equipment while the insulation was being removed. Instead, insulation removal was performed by independent contractors who specialized in insulation removal, and other FP&L workers. Mr. Batchelor did work in the vicinity of other workers removing insulation, but it is unclear how close Mr. Batchelor worked to those removing asbestos, how often this occurred, or the duration of the occurrences. When asked by his attorney if the dust he breathed in was from insulation, Mr. Batchelor responded, “It could be from anywhere. It’s just dust.”

One of the contractors retained to provide ongoing maintenance services of the equipment on site was defendant Bechtel. The contracts provided that FP&L would issue work orders at its discretion to Bechtel, which would do the work requested on a cost-plus basis. FP&L decided whether FP&L or Bechtel would provide needed supplies, equipment, and ancillary services. During the relevant time period, Bechtel provided 1,050,070 man hours of services at Turkey Point.

FP&L periodically shut down the units for repair and maintenance. During these shutdowns, FP&L had Bechtel perform major overhauls on the units. FP&L also had another contractor, Foster Wheeler, perform maintenance on the unit’s giant boilers, which were lined with insulation. Although other contractors were present most of the time, Bechtel received work instructions only from FP&L.

In 2015, Mr. Batchelor was diagnosed with terminal mesothelioma caused by asbestos exposure. On January 2, 2016, he filed suit against twenty-six defendants, including Bechtel Corporation, for negligently causing his mesothelioma. Mr. Batchelor’s medical causation expert never examined Mr. Batchelor and never visited Turkey Point. He based his opinion solely on a review of Mr. Batchelor’s deposition
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According to the Supreme Court of Illinois, merely conducting business within that state is insufficient to satisfy the standards for personal jurisdiction established by the U.S. Supreme Court in Daimler AG v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014).  The Illinois Supreme Court recently explored that issue in Aspen American Insurance Company v. Interstate Warehousing, Inc., where a plaintiff headquarted in Indiana attempted to bring an action in Illinois for damages allegedly caused by the collapse of a warehouse in Michigan.  Plaintiff Aspen brought a subrogation action in Cook County, Illinois seeking to recover damages allegedly caused by the collapse of a warehouse near Grand Rapids, Michigan, which was owned by Defendant Interstate Warehousing. The Defendant, which is headquartered in Indiana, operates eight warehouses across the country, one of which is in Joliet, Illinois.

In its pleadings, the Plaintiff sought to rely upon the Defendant’s Joliet warehouse to establish personal jurisdiction in Illinois. In its motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction, the Defendant did not dispute that it was doing business in Illinois. Instead, the Defendant argued that the business it was conducting in Illinois was insufficient to subject it to general personal jurisdiction under the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler AG v. Bauman. Relying on Daimler, the Defendant explained that the Plaintiff failed to establish that the Defendant was either domiciled or “at home” in Illinois. The circuit court disagreed, and denied the Defendant’s motion. A divided appellate court affirmed the dismissal denial of the motion to dismiss.

                                                                                                                                                                                   

Writing on behalf of a unanimous Court, Justice Burke reversed the lower court decisions, holding that the Plaintiff failed to make a prima facie showing that the Defendant was “essentially at home” in Illinois, as required by Daimler. More specifically, the Court determined that the Plaintiff’s burden was to show that the Defendant was incorporated or had its principal place of business in Illinois, or in the alternative, that the Defendant’s contacts with Illinois were so substantial that an exception was warranted. In making its determination, the Court looked at Perkins v. Benguet Consolidated Mining Co., 342 U.S. 437 (1952), in which the defendant, a Philippines company, was forced to relocate from the Philippines to Ohio during World War II. In that case, the Supreme Court found that Ohio was “the center of the corporation’s wartime activities” and, effectively, a “surrogate for the place of incorporation or head office.” Perkins, 342 U.S. at 448.

In the Aspen case, the Defendant Interstate Warehousing was an Indiana corporation with its principal place of business in Indiana, which was registered to conduct business in Illinois and employed the general manager of a warehouse in Joliet. The Plaintiff pointed both to the Defendant’s registration with the Illinois Secretary of State and the business it carried out at its Joliet warehouse as establishing jurisdiction; however, the Illinois Supreme Court ultimately concluded that those facts were insufficient either to render the Defendant at home in the state or to
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The Second District Court of Appeal, Division Four in Los Angeles handed down a decision in an asbestos case that involved appellate issues pertaining to causes of action for strict products liability and premises liability, primary and secondary (“take-home”) exposure, liability for replacement component parts, and proper jury instructions to be given in asbestos cases on the issue of substantial factor.  Joseph Petitpas v. Ford Motor Company, et al. (Cal. Ct. App., July 5, 2017, No. B245037), an opinion certified for publication on July 5, 2017, presents several factual scenarios to test a number of the decisions in the past decade that continue to shape asbestos litigation in California.   Motions for summary adjudication and defense jury verdicts were affirmed for Ford Motor Company and Exxon Mobile Corporation, while the trial court’s granting of a nonsuit for defendant Rossmoor Corporation was also affirmed.

Background

Plaintiffs  Marline and Joseph Petitpas filed suit against over 30 defendants, alleging Marline’s mesothelioma was caused by exposure to asbestos from sources including, but not limited to, direct exposure from being in the presence of automotive maintenance work, secondary exposure by coming into contact  with Joseph’s clothes and person after he performed automotive maintenance work, primary exposure by visiting Joseph at construction sites while he was employed as an architectural drafter for Rossmoor, and secondary exposure through contact with Joseph’s clothes and person after he  visited construction sites in the course of his employment with Rossmoor.  Marline passed away during the appeal.

Issue One

Prior to trial, Exxon was granted summary adjudication of Plaintiffs’ strict products liability claim.  Exxon, a premises defendant, demonstrated that in the course of Joseph’s work at a service station for which Exxon assumed liabilities, Joseph used replacement clutches and gaskets that came from a local independent auto parts store.  Exxon also showed that Joseph used brakes obtained from a mobile brake service company that not only provided brakes but also performed brake work at the service station.  Exxon’s evidence was sufficient to support an inference that the service station was not primarily in the business of supplying asbestos-containing vehicle parts.  In distinguishing this case from its decision in Hernandezcueva v. E.F. Brady Company, Inc. (2015) 243 Cal.App.4th 249, the Court found the service station was a provider of services rather than a seller or distributor of asbestos-containing parts.  The Court also found no relationship existed between the service station and parts manufacturers in which the station could exert any influence on product safety on the manufacturers.  Exxon was not in the stream of commerce for asbestos-containing vehicle parts to the extent strict liability was warranted.

Issue Two

Exxon had also been granted summary adjudication relating to Plaintiffs’ claims of secondary exposure to asbestos.  The trial court applied Campbell v. Ford Motor Co.  (2012) 206 Cal.App.4th 15 and found that Exxon was a property owner that had no duty to protect family members of workers on its premises from secondary exposure to asbestos used during the court of the property owner’s business.  During
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