In December 2017, the EPA approved revisions to the Louisiana State Implementation Plan (“SIP”) addressing regional haze. Neither environmental groups—Sierra Club and National Parks Conservation Association—nor affected utility companies—Entergy and Cleco—are satisfied with the EPA’s rule, and they are now petitioning the Fifth Circuit as intervenors on behalf of the EPA. Both sides filed briefs on October 30, 2018.

By way of background, Congress added regional haze provisions to the Clean Air Act (“CAA”) in 1977. The Act requires pollution sources that emit any air pollutant that may reasonably be anticipated to cause or contribute to visibility impairment to operate with the best available retrofit technology (“BART”).

In evaluating BART, the CAA requires states to balance cost with 1) the energy and non-air quality environmental impacts of compliance; 2) existing pollution control technology in use at the source; 3) the source’s remaining useful life; and 4) the visibility improvements that may reasonably be anticipated to result from the use of such technology.

The EPA issued BART Guidelines in 2005. The Guidelines help states determine whether BART applies to a particular source of pollution. In June 2008, Louisiana submitted its first Regional Haze SIP. The EPA did not approve the plan because it relied on the Clean Air Interstate Rule, which was judicially invalidated before the EPA ruled on the plan. The EPA also found deficiencies in BART determinations for four non-electrical generating units.

Louisiana submitted a revised SIP in July 2017, which the EPA approved in December 2017. The revised SIP was based on analysis conducted by the EPA and Entergy. The Fifth Circuit litigation primarily addresses the BART for Entergy’s Nelson power plant and Cleco’s Brame Energy Center, which both emit large amounts of sulfur dioxide.
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MG+M obtained on June 1, 2018, an order granting summary judgment and dismissal of its client, a nationwide distributor of Asian food products in the 24th Judicial District Court for the Parish of Jefferson in the state of Louisiana. The plaintiff consumed sushi at a New Orleans area sushi restaurant and within days became violently ill, followed by 9 days of hospitalization caused by salmonella poisoning.  The Centers for Disease Control eventually traced the plaintiff’s poisoning to contaminated ground tuna that had been imported into the United States from India.  Some of the ground tuna that originated from India had been distributed by MG+M’s client to the New Orleans sushi restaurant chain.  Other defendants in the case included Little Tokyo Restaurant, and Moon Marine (settled manufacturer). Over 400 cases of the poisoning were reported nationwide, with many lawsuits brought in several jurisdictions.  The plaintiff’s alleged medical conditions resulting from the poisoning episode were: autoimmune thyroid disease, Cushing’s Syndrome, gastrointestinal problems, kidney tumors, lifetime vitamin B-12 deficiency, and Stargardt’s disease (early onset macular degeneration leading to blindness). MG+M persuaded the court, following ample discovery, that its client notified the New Orleans restaurant chain customer of the nationwide recall of the tuna product in a timely manner, and otherwise met its legal duty to the plaintiff and consuming public in this food-provider poisoning case.

MG+M’s Lake Charles Partner, David R. Frohn, was lead counsel, and he received excellent support from the firm’s New Orleans Associate, Helen M. Buckley.

 
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A tale of two verdicts (1)Frequently as litigators, we are faced with questions about which factors can make or break a trial. The facts of each case and skill of counsel are obvious elements to obtaining a favorable verdict, but outcomes can also be heavily influenced by the venue, pre-trial rulings, voir dire, jury instructions and even the sheer whim of a jury.

Within the last few weeks, two separate verdicts came down in mesothelioma lawsuits. Both cases were heard in state courts, both cases involved a deceased plaintiff, both cases were brought by the same plaintiffs’ firm that specializes in asbestos claims, and both cases had only one defendant remaining at the time of verdict. However, one jury found for the defense, while the other awarded $81.5 million to the plaintiffs. What were the specific facts of each case, and what were the factors that might explain how two similar cases turned out so differently?

New Orleans, Louisiana

Mr. Thomas Hayden died of pleural mesothelioma in March 2016. He served in the Navy aboard the USS Edson in the 1960s, during which time he often worked in the boiler rooms. He later worked as a mechanic for a several decades, working on tractors, and, during this time, he also worked building scaffolding at various industrial facilities throughout South Louisiana. He alleged generally that he had worked with asbestos-containing friction products while working on tractors, and that he was in the vicinity of asbestos-containing products, particularly asbestos insulation, while he constructed scaffolding. Importantly, the plaintiffs in Hayden stipulated that they would not seek any damages for exposure to asbestos related to Mr. Hayden’s time in the Navy. Accordingly, the suit remained in state court.

Of the 72 originally sued defendants, only ExxonMobil, Corp. remained at the time of verdict. About 15 parties were dismissed via summary judgment, one (1) party was bankrupt, and the remaining parties settled or were dismissed voluntarily. Mr. Hayden was never employed directly by Exxon, but rather he allegedly worked as a contractor building scaffolding at an Exxon facility in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He could not identify whether he worked on the chemical or the refinery side of the Exxon facility. He could not recall if the scaffolding he built was for new construction or maintenance. Nor could he recall handling any asbestos-containing products at Exxon.  Moreover, he could not identify the brand name or manufacturer of any products installed by other crafts. He could not even recall seeing any pipe insulation at Exxon. Finally, his work at Exxon was for a total of approximately one (1) week, sometime between 1982 and 1985.

Counsel for Exxon stressed Mr. Hayden’s inability to recall basic details about his alleged work at the Exxon facility, suggesting to jurors that this lack of memory was because Mr. Hayden never actually worked at Exxon. In closing arguments, counsel for Exxon contrasted the dearth of testimony regarding Mr. Hayden’s alleged work at Exxon with his ability to recall co-workers, supervisors, and products at other worksites. Counsel suggested
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Artboard 1You get served with a citation in a new products suit. The facts do not look good. The airbag system didn’t deploy. Maybe a tire exploded. Perhaps the steering assembly failed. A call is made to the plaintiff’s attorney – you want an expert to use an onboard diagnostic tool to test for what went wrong. Expecting to reach an amenable date for an inspection, you get a response that you were not quite expecting – the vehicle (or tire or steering assembly) has been salvaged and is no longer available for inspection. What happens next, and the legal theories involved, undoubtedly vary from state to state. Here we take a brief look at Louisiana law on the “case of the missing product.”

Adverse Presumption

In Williams v. General Motors Corp., 639 So. 2d 275, 276 (La. App. 4 Cir. 1994), the plaintiff was driving as 1985 Buick manufactured by GM when his steering failed and his vehicle veered into a guardrail. After the accident, the Williams’ damaged vehicle was taken to Jackie Rowan’s Automotive Repair where “[a]n employee of the repair shop discarded the rack and pinion steering assembly. Mr. Williams, therefore, could not produce those parts at the trial in support of his claim that they were defective.” Id. at 278. General Motors asserted that the failure to produce those parts in court “creates a presumption that the evidence would have been unfavorable to his cause.” Id. The court held that “[w]here a litigant fails to produce evidence available to him and gives no reasonable explanation, the presumption is that the evidence would have been unfavorable to him….the record supports Mr. Williams’ contention that the part was inadvertently discarded when it was mistaken for scrap metal by an employee of Jackie Rowan’s Automotive Repair Shop.” Id. The court held that Mr. Williams therefore provided a reasonable explanation for his failure to produce the evidence in court and no such unfavorable presumption applied. Id.

While in the Williams case the plaintiff was able to provide a ‘reasonable explanation’ for his failure to produce the allegedly defect part, such a determination is fact intensive and varies from case to case. Depending on the plaintiff’s response to the inquiry requesting an inspection of the product, there may be an opportunity to seek an adverse presumption prior to trial.

 

The Firestone Case & Summary Judgment

firestoneAlternatively, if the facts so align, a more cost effective approach may be a motion for summary judgment. In a very recent case, Gladney v. Milam, 39, 982 (La. App. 2 Cir. 9/21/15); 911 So. 2d 366, the plaintiff was driving a leased van equipped with Firestone tires when the van’s right front tire failed and the plaintiff lost control of his vehicle. Firestone filed a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that plaintiff could not prove a defective condition without producing the tire at issue, which had gone missing for reasons unknown. Id. at 368. The plaintiff had
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