Food & Beverage Litigation

MG+M obtained on June 1, 2018, an order granting summary judgment and dismissal of its client, a nationwide distributor of Asian food products in the 24th Judicial District Court for the Parish of Jefferson in the state of Louisiana. The plaintiff consumed sushi at a New Orleans area sushi restaurant and within days became violently ill, followed by 9 days of hospitalization caused by salmonella poisoning.  The Centers for Disease Control eventually traced the plaintiff’s poisoning to contaminated ground tuna that had been imported into the United States from India.  Some of the ground tuna that originated from India had been distributed by MG+M’s client to the New Orleans sushi restaurant chain.  Other defendants in the case included Little Tokyo Restaurant, and Moon Marine (settled manufacturer). Over 400 cases of the poisoning were reported nationwide, with many lawsuits brought in several jurisdictions.  The plaintiff’s alleged medical conditions resulting from the poisoning episode were: autoimmune thyroid disease, Cushing’s Syndrome, gastrointestinal problems, kidney tumors, lifetime vitamin B-12 deficiency, and Stargardt’s disease (early onset macular degeneration leading to blindness). MG+M persuaded the court, following ample discovery, that its client notified the New Orleans restaurant chain customer of the nationwide recall of the tuna product in a timely manner, and otherwise met its legal duty to the plaintiff and consuming public in this food-provider poisoning case.

MG+M’s Lake Charles Partner, David R. Frohn, was lead counsel, and he received excellent support from the firm’s New Orleans Associate, Helen M. Buckley.

 
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In Santiago[1] v. Rich Products Corp., et al.[2], the Massachusetts Appeals Court held that a finding of spoliation requires both: (1) the negligent and intentional loss or destruction of evidence; and (2) the awareness of the spoliator at the time the evidence is lost or destroyed of the potential for the evidence to help resolve the dispute. The Santiago Court’s strict interpretation of the doctrine of spoliation follows the trend of Massachusetts litigation, shifting focus from the first element, the spoliator’s conduct to the second element, its mental state. The opinion also accentuates the fact that non-compliance with a document retention policy does not equate to per se spoliation.

The underlying dispute arose in 2006, when the plaintiff, Kelvin Santiago, then a 7-year-old first grader at Lowell public schools, experienced traumatic brain damage after choking on meatballs that were served to him during school lunch. The plaintiffs (Kelvin Santiago and his parents) sued the city of Lowell and the entity that produced and sold the meatballs, Rich Products, asserting negligence, breach of the implied warranty of merchantability, and Chapter 93A consumer protection claims, amongst others. Id. at 2. By way of background, in 2004, as part of the Federal government’s initiative to provide healthy lunches to students through the National School Lunch Program, Rich Products began providing and producing meatballs that met the healthy-lunch specification guidelines. To comply with standards promulgated by the United States Department of Agriculture, Rich Products used Profam 974, a soy protein isolate, to achieve the requisite “two ounces of protein per student [per lunch].” Santiago, No. 16-P-504 at 3. The plaintiffs’ counsel argued that the inclusion of Profam 974 rendered the product unreasonably dangerous, because the soy protein produced a meatball whose texture made it a choking hazard. Id. at 6

Upon enduring substantial discovery and motion hearings, in 2014, the Superior Court awarded the city of Lowell summary judgment, and a jury found that Rich Products was not responsible, on the basis that its negligence was not a “substantial contributing factor to the plaintiffs’ injuries.” Id. at 2-3. On appeal, the plaintiffs argued that the trial court erred by, among other things, denying the plaintiffs’ request for an adverse-inference instruction regarding Rich Products’ alleged spoliation of evidence. Id. On December 28, 2017, the Appeals Court “conclude[d] that the trial judge did not abuse his discretion in declining to give a spoliation instruction because the plaintiffs failed to establish the necessary factual predicate that Rich Products lost or destroyed the missing evidence when it knew or should have known of a potential lawsuit.” Id. (emphasis added).

Spoliation is the destruction of evidence, negligently or intentionally, when the litigant is aware or should be reasonably aware that the evidence is relevant to a potential action, whether or not the action has officially commenced. Id. at 7 (citing Mass. G. Evid. § 1102 (2017)). “The doctrine does not extend to a fault-free destruction or
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