In a 2-1 opinion, the Fourth District Court of Appeal continued to apply the law which bars marrying into a cause of action, but a strong dissenting opinion and noted public policy concerns could trigger further review.

In Florida, as in various other jurisdictions, the courts follow the common law marriage before injury rule. This rule requires a party to be married to the injured person prior to the time of the injury in order to assert a claim for loss of consortium – i.e. loss of companionship and support. The rationale behind this rule is that a person should be unable to marry into a cause of action. This rule has been consistently applied in personal injury cases including toxic tort and products liability cases of the “creeping” variety, such as asbestos and tobacco.

In the recent decision issued in Janis Kelly v. Georgia-Pacific, LLC, et al., No. 4D15-4666 (Fla. 4th DCA February 22, 2017) the Court was asked to look at this issue in the context of a wrongful death claim. In Kelly, Plaintiffs originally filed a personal injury claim asserting causes of action for negligence, strict liability, and for Mrs. Kelly’s loss of consortium arising from Mr. Kelly’s alleged exposure to asbestos while working in construction from 1973 to 1974. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were not married until 1976, two years after Mr. Kelly’s alleged asbestos exposure. Mr. Kelly died during the course of the litigation at which time Mrs. Kelly amended the complaint to allege a claim for wrongful death, which included a demand for loss of consortium damages. The Defendants moved to dismiss Mrs. Kelly’s claims for loss of consortium as Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were not married at the time of Mr. Kelly’s alleged injury. When the trial court granted the motion to dismiss, Plaintiff voluntarily dismissed the remaining claims and the appeal followed.

On appeal, the Court addressed whether the Florida Wrongful Death Act supersedes the common law requirement that a spouse must be married to the decedent before the time of the injury to recover consortium damages. And, the Court revisited the question of whether the common-law marriage before injury rule should apply in “creeping” cases where the injury is a latent injury that does not reveal itself until after the parties marry.

On the first issue, the Court looked to the legislative intent of Florida’s Wrongful Death Act, to determine if the Act supersedes the common law of loss of consortium– i.e. did the statute unequivocally state that it changes the common law or is it so repugnant to the common law that the two cannot coexist. Thornber v. City of Fort Walton Beach, 568 So.2d 914, 918 (Fla. 1990). In applying Thornber, the Court found that the plain language of the Act clearly intended to allow for the survivors of the decedent to recover damages, including the surviving spouse to recover “consortium-type” damages. See ACandS, Inc. v. Redd, 703 So.2d 494 (Fla. 3d DCA 1007). The Court found,
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e-cigarette-1301664__340Recently, the Food and Drug Administration has regulated electronic cigarettes, making it illegal to sell e-cigarettes to anyone under 18. Similarly, California recently enacted legislation requiring a minimum purchase age of 21 for e-cigarettes.

Tobacco critic Stanton Glantz argued in favor of the minimum purchase age, stating that “There’s no question that e-cigarettes aren’t as dangerous as cigarettes are,” he says, “but they’re still dangerous.” Federal regulations have also prohibited e-cigarette retailers from providing free samples to customers and state regulations have required retailers to register and obtain a license.

E-cigarettes contain nicotine, flavoring, and a propylene glycol (a food additive classified as “generally recognized as safe” by the FDA). However, e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco, the main carcinogen in traditional cigarettes.

Is Vaping a Safe Way to Quit?

In contrast to the American approach, in the United Kingdom, “British health officials released what was billed as a ‘landmark review’ of electronic cigarettes. In it, e-cigarettes were described as “‘around 95 percent safer than smoking’” and “the study encouraged e-cigs to be labeled as an effective means of helping smokers curb and kick the deadly habit.”

A cutting-edge study funded by Cancer Research UK has demonstrated that if smokers completely quit smoking tobacco and switch to vaping, they will substantially reduce their intake of toxic chemicals and carcinogens. According to lead research Lion Shahab, a senior lecturer at University College London, the “study shows that bodily level exposure to established and important smoking-related carcinogens and toxicants is reduced by between 56 percent to 97 percent in long-term e-cigarette users who have stopped smoking completely, compared with tobacco cigarette smokers.”

According to Dr. Ed Stephens, senior research fellow at the University of St. Andrews, “This paper confirms the potential benefits of e-cigarettes and contributes to the growing body of evidence that the risk from chemicals in vapour is far lower than in cigarette smoke when an e-cigarette is used as the manufacturer intended.”

Make Vaping Great Again?

Although there is now scientific evidence that vaping represents a significantly safer alternative to smoking, regulators and anti-smoking advocates are continuing their efforts to regulate electronic cigarettes.

Given the lack of scientific consensus on the issue of the risks involved with e-cigarettes and the potential to save the lives of cigarette smokers, regulators should be encouraged not to enact any additional regulations that could decrease access to e-cigarettes and should consider reevaluating or repealing existing regulations. American regulators should adopt the “light touch” approach advocated by Cancer Research UK.

Meanwhile, some trade groups have expressed cautious optimism that the FDA will delay implementation of e-cigarette regulation in the Trump administration.

The issue continues to be hotly debated, leaving e-cigarette manufacturers, retailers, and their insurers to educate themselves regarding the applicable laws and regulations and put effective policies in place to guard against regulatory violations and lawsuits.
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battleshipIt is no secret that, in many instances, injured tort plaintiffs would prefer to file their cases in state court as opposed to federal court. One of the many reasons for this preference is that the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure place express limits on the amount of discovery available to parties.  Further, the Federal Rules of Evidence tend to be more stringent, as are requirements for expert witnesses.  These, and the notion that federal courts tend to grant motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment more frequently and award lower verdicts, means that plaintiffs would often rather file their cases in state court and conversely, defendants often prefer to litigate these cases in federal court. Consequently, when possible, defendants often will remove a case filed in state court to the applicable U.S. District Court where the state action was pending. One such method of removal is found in 28 U.S.C. § 1442(a)(1), the federal-officer removal statute. Specifically, § 1442(a)(1) allows a defendant that acted under any United States agency or officer to remove a plaintiff’s suit to federal court if any of the alleged claims or defenses relate to “any act under color of such office.” This is a frequently used tool of military contractors to get their government contractor defense heard by a federal court.

Government contractor immunity is a recognized federal defense based on public policy (See Boyle v. United Technologies Corp., 487 U.S. 500 (1988)). It is an offshoot of the governmental immunity doctrine codified in 28 U.S.C. § 2680, which insulates the federal government from suit in relation to the performance of its discretionary actions. Military contractors may be extended the benefits of §2680 in a product liability action if they can demonstrate that: (1) the government “approved reasonably precise specifications” for their product; (2) the product conformed to those specifications; and (3) the contractor warned the government about the dangers in the use of the product that were known to it but not to the government.”  Boyle, 487 U.S. at 512.

Military contractors of all stripes expressed a collective sigh of relief on January 20, 2017, when the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals fortified the federal officer removal statute in Zeringue v. Crane Co., 2017 WL 279496 (5th Cir. 2017), a decision which overturned the Eastern District of Louisiana’s remand of an asbestos plaintiff’s suit to Orleans Parish District Court. In Zeringue, the Plaintiff filed suit in Louisiana state court alleging that he first was exposed to asbestos while serving aboard U.S. Navy ships during the 1950s. Crane, one of more than twenty defendants in the case, was a major supplier of asbestos-containing valves, among other equipment, to the Navy. Accordingly, Crane invoked the federal officer removal statute so that it could litigate the case in federal district court. It argued that removal was proper because “any product [Zeringue] alleges Crane Co. manufactured for or supplied to the Navy (and any product literature, labeling, or warnings
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Artboard 1You get served with a citation in a new products suit. The facts do not look good. The airbag system didn’t deploy. Maybe a tire exploded. Perhaps the steering assembly failed. A call is made to the plaintiff’s attorney – you want an expert to use an onboard diagnostic tool to test for what went wrong. Expecting to reach an amenable date for an inspection, you get a response that you were not quite expecting – the vehicle (or tire or steering assembly) has been salvaged and is no longer available for inspection. What happens next, and the legal theories involved, undoubtedly vary from state to state. Here we take a brief look at Louisiana law on the “case of the missing product.”

Adverse Presumption

In Williams v. General Motors Corp., 639 So. 2d 275, 276 (La. App. 4 Cir. 1994), the plaintiff was driving as 1985 Buick manufactured by GM when his steering failed and his vehicle veered into a guardrail. After the accident, the Williams’ damaged vehicle was taken to Jackie Rowan’s Automotive Repair where “[a]n employee of the repair shop discarded the rack and pinion steering assembly. Mr. Williams, therefore, could not produce those parts at the trial in support of his claim that they were defective.” Id. at 278. General Motors asserted that the failure to produce those parts in court “creates a presumption that the evidence would have been unfavorable to his cause.” Id. The court held that “[w]here a litigant fails to produce evidence available to him and gives no reasonable explanation, the presumption is that the evidence would have been unfavorable to him….the record supports Mr. Williams’ contention that the part was inadvertently discarded when it was mistaken for scrap metal by an employee of Jackie Rowan’s Automotive Repair Shop.” Id. The court held that Mr. Williams therefore provided a reasonable explanation for his failure to produce the evidence in court and no such unfavorable presumption applied. Id.

While in the Williams case the plaintiff was able to provide a ‘reasonable explanation’ for his failure to produce the allegedly defect part, such a determination is fact intensive and varies from case to case. Depending on the plaintiff’s response to the inquiry requesting an inspection of the product, there may be an opportunity to seek an adverse presumption prior to trial.

 

The Firestone Case & Summary Judgment

firestoneAlternatively, if the facts so align, a more cost effective approach may be a motion for summary judgment. In a very recent case, Gladney v. Milam, 39, 982 (La. App. 2 Cir. 9/21/15); 911 So. 2d 366, the plaintiff was driving a leased van equipped with Firestone tires when the van’s right front tire failed and the plaintiff lost control of his vehicle. Firestone filed a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that plaintiff could not prove a defective condition without producing the tire at issue, which had gone missing for reasons unknown. Id. at 368. The plaintiff had
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district court
Washington, D.C. District Court of Appeals

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals recently adopted the standards found in Federal Rule of Evidence 702 (“Rule 702”), regarding the admissibility of testimony by expert witnesses, thereby replacing the Frye (“Frye”) test.  See Motorola Inc., et al. v. Michael Patrick Murray, et al., 2016 WL 6134870 (October 20, 2016)(“Motorola”). Washington D.C. is now the most recent jurisdiction to adopt Rule 702, a trend that has continued since Rule 702 was amended in 2000 to reflect United States Supreme Court decisions pertaining to expert witness testimony, such as Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993); Kumho Tire Co. v. Carmichael, 526 U.S. 137 (1999); and General Electric v. Joiner, 522 U.S. 136 (1997).

Rule 702 provides:

A witness who is qualified as an expert by knowledge, skill, experience, training, or education may testify in the form of an opinion or otherwise if:

  1. the expert’s scientific, technical, or other specialized knowledge will help the trier of fact to understand the evidence or to determine a fact in issue;
  2. the testimony is based on sufficient facts or data;
  3. the testimony is the product of reliable principles and methods; and
  4. the expert has reliably applied the principles and methods to the facts of the case.

In Motorola Plaintiffs in thirteen cases sued numerous cell phone manufacturers, service providers, and trade associations, alleging that long-term exposure to cell-phone radiation caused their brain tumors. The trial Judge Frederick H. Weisberg, held four weeks of evidentiary hearings on the admissibility of the expert testimony offered by the plaintiffs. He concluded that, based on the record before him, some, but not all, of Plaintiffs’ proffered expert testimony on general causation was admissible under the Frye evidentiary standard, but “most, if not all, of Plaintiffs’ experts would probably be excluded under the Rule 702/Daubert standard.” Judge Weisberg then certified the following question of law to the Circuit Court: “whether the District of Columbia should adopt Federal Rule of Evidence 702 (or a revised Frye standard) for the admissibility of expert evidence.”

In certifying the question, Judge Weisberg noted,

[A]t the risk of over-simplification[,] if a reliable, but not yet generally accepted, methodology produces ‘good science,’ Daubert will let it in, and if an accepted methodology produces ‘bad science,’ Daubert will keep it out; conversely, under Frye, as applied in this jurisdiction, even if a new methodology produces ‘good science,’ it will usually be excluded, but if an accepted methodology produces ‘bad science,’ it is likely to be admitted.

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals, en banc., heard the question, Plaintiffs’ appeal, and adopted the Rule 702 standards unanimously, with Judge Easterly providing a concurring opinion.

Associate Judge Fisher, writing for the Court, stated, “the ability to focus on the reliability of principles and methods, and their application, is a decided advantage that will lead to better decision-making by juries and trial judges
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