In a recent decision, the Rhode Island Superior Court ruled that claims brought against a dissolved entity’s insurers are barred pursuant to R.I. General Laws § 27-7-2.  This statute bars direct actions against insurers of alleged tortfeasors absent very limited exceptions.

In Shirley D’Amico, et al. v. A.O. Smith Corp., et al. (C.A. PC12-0403), the Rhode Island Superior Court examined whether one of those exceptions to R.I. General Laws § 27-7-2, which allows direct actions against the insurers of a bankrupt entity, similarly permits a direct action against the insurers of a dissolved entity.  The underlying facts of the case were straightforward.  Plaintiff alleged that her husband, Frank D’Amico, died from malignant mesothelioma proximately caused by occupational exposure to asbestos.  This exposure, according to Plaintiff, took place during Mr. D’Amico’s service in the United States Navy and his subsequent employment at various golf courses.  Plaintiff filed the original complaint on January 25, 2012.  After multiple amendments, Plaintiff filed a fifth amended complaint on June 11, 2015, to include Grover S. Wormer Company (“Wormer”) as a defendant.  In accordance with Michigan Corporate Code, [1]Wormer was dissolved as of January 10, 2008.  As such, on February 28, 2018, the Court dismissed Plaintiff’s claims against Wormer, finding they were barred by the laws of State of Michigan.


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In a recent case, a Rhode Island Jury awarded $31.3 million to Brett and Stacie Smith after a 2014 swimming accident in a pond at the University of Rhode Island left Mr. Smith paralyzed from the chest down.  The jury found that the University of Rhode Island was negligent in its failure to post warning signs and to inform its guests that swimming was prohibited.

The Smiths were attending a wedding during the weekend of July 25, 2014, at the Whispering Pines Conference Center.  After the rehearsal dinner, several members of the wedding party decided to go swimming in Louttit Pond.  After twenty or so minutes in the water, Mr. Smith and some others swam to, and climbed atop, a large rock in the middle of the pond.  They dove off and began to swim away from the rock.  While swimming underwater, Mr. Smith struck his head on a submerged rock, causing his paralysis.

The case focused on whether the defendants owed Mr. Smith a duty of care.  The plaintiffs argued that a duty existed for the defendants to post warning signs indicating that swimming was not allowed or describing the potential danger.  Conversely, the defendants argued that no duty existed as Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries and that the potential dangers were open and obvious.

At trial, the major issue primarily focused on whether it was reasonably foreseeable that individuals would swim and be injured in the subject pond.  The plaintiffs put forth evidence that the management of the property had outlawed swimming in the pond due to potentially dangerous conditions, but did not install signs that forbade swimming on the property or warned of the dangers that the pond possessed.   The plaintiffs argued that this failure constituted negligence, as it was foreseeable that: 1) people would swim in the pond; 2) the very nature of the property lent itself to swimming as it promoted access to the outdoors, specifically, the water as well as numerous outdoor activities; and 3) the pond had a dock and a canoe launching point which encouraged people to use the water.

The defendants asserted two main defenses: 1) Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries; 2) the condition was open and obvious. In Rhode Island, assumption of the risk is an affirmative defense that absolves a defendant of liability regardless of the defendant’s own negligence.  Loffredo v. Merrimack Mutual Fire Ins. Co., 669 A.2d 1162 (R.I. 1996).  To prevail on the assumption of the risk defense, defendants need to show that a plaintiff voluntarily encountered an unreasonable risk and appreciated its unreasonable character.  Id.  In examining this subjective standard, one must look at what the particular plaintiff saw, knew, understood, and appreciated.  Id.  As for the open-and-obvious defense, a property owner in Rhode Island is not liable for injuries that a guest suffered while on an owner’s premises when that guest was engaging in an open and obvious danger. Bucki v. Hawkins, 914
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In a recent decision, the Rhode Island Supreme Court ruled that when an arbitration award exceeds the insurance policy limits, the Superior Court cannot consider the policy limits, or the insurance policy itself, in a motion to modify the award, unless the insurance company asserted a policy limit defense at the arbitration and provided a copy of the policy to the arbitrator.

In Lemerise v. Commerce Ins. Co., the Rhode Island Supreme Court held that trial courts may not supplement the review of a motion to modify an arbitration award pursuant to R.I. General Laws Section 10-3-14 with testimony, other evidence, and even arguments, if those items were not raised during the arbitration.  137 A.3d 692 (R.I. 2016).  This new precedent provides instructions to the trial court when reviewing motions to modify arbitration awards.  Courts are now forbidden to review evidence and arguments that were not presented or raised during the arbitration proceedings, and have been instructed to confirm arbitration awards unless the narrow exceptions outlined in Section 10-3-14 apply.

 

The underlying matter in Lemerise involved a dispute between the plaintiff, Joseph Lemerise, and the defendant, the Commerce Insurance Company.  In August 2011, Mr. Lemerise was struck by an uninsured motorist while crossing a street in Newport, Rhode Island.  Lemerise, 137 A.3d at 697.  Following the accident, Mr. Lemerise filed a claim for coverage under his automobile insurance policy through Commerce.  Id.  The parties unsuccessfully attempted to negotiate appropriate compensation for Mr. Lemerise’s injuries and a suit was subsequently filed in the Newport County Superior Court.  Id.  After filing the suit, the parties agreed to participate in arbitration pursuant to the terms of Mr. Lemerise’s uninsured motorist policy.  Id. at 705.  The arbitrator sought to determine the extent of Mr. Lemerise’s injuries and award sufficient compensation.  Id. at 698.  The arbitrator assessed Mr. Lemerise’s injuries at $150,000 and added prejudgment interest of $47,550, which brought the total award to $197,550.  Id. This total was well above the policy limit of $100,000.  Id.

At the conclusion of the arbitration, Mr. Lemerise moved in the superior court to confirm the arbitration award, and Commerce filed a motion seeking modification.  Id. at 698.  While reviewing the motions, the superior court supplemented its review of the issues at hand with a copy of Mr. Lemerise’s insurance policy, as well as testimony from the arbitrator.  Id.  The superior court justice granted Commerce’s motion to modify the award to conform with the insurance policy limit of $100,000.  Id. at 699.  The justice stated that he would not “allow [Mr. Lemerise] to take advantage of some technicality to get more than he bargained for in this case.”  Id.  Mr. Lemerise appealed to the Rhode Island Supreme Court, seeking a reversal of the superior court’s holding and a confirmation of the initial arbitration award.  Id.

The sole issue presented before the Supreme Court was whether the trial justice erred in granting the motion to modify the award, when, after supplementing the
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