lawjUSTICEBWThis month, attorneys working at Guantanamo Bay’s Camp Justice filed a lawsuit against the Department of Defense (Seeger et al v. U.S. Department of Defense et al, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia, No. 17-00639), in which they allege that they have been exposed to dangerously high levels of carcinogens from working in contaminated areas. The four attorneys, who include Army Major Matthew Seeger and three civilian attorneys, represent Walid Bin Attash, a Yemeni man charged with helping to plot the attacks of September 11, 2001.

The attorneys’ complaint alleges that various environmental hazards at the Guantanamo Bay Camp Justice complex have been linked to nine cases of cancer since 2008 among individuals who worked at the camp, and that the U.S. Navy has not properly investigated these conditions. The nine individuals range between the ages of 35 and 52, and their diagnosed illnesses have included lymphoma, colon, brain, and appendix cancer. Camp Justice is located on the site of a former airfield, and includes temporary housing units, as well as offices where the attorneys both live and work while at the camp. This former airfield was at one point allegedly used to dispose of jet fuel.

The complaint alleges that the attorneys first approached authorities with complaints in July, 2015 and requested an investigation into whether conditions at Camp Justice had contributed to several cancer cases among employees who worked at the camp. The suit further alleges that the U.S. Navy conducted a flawed investigation of the alleged environmental hazards, failing to determine what kind of a risk they posed to personnel and further failing to determine appropriate measures to remedy the situation.

The Navy’s preliminary investigation included an industrial hygiene and habitability survey of Camp Justice’s buildings where personnel live and work. The investigation documented the presence of multiple environmental hazards, including poorly-maintained asbestos-containing floor tile, lead-based paint chips, air samples that tested positive for mercury and formaldehyde, and soil samples that tested positive for benzopryene. All of these substances have been found to be carcinogenic. The Navy’s report acknowledged that their environmental and historical investigations were limited, but nevertheless found that there was insufficient evidence to address potential exposures to carcinogens. With that, they deemed the property’s buildings to be habitable. Additionally, following a review of military health records, they concluded that the number and types of cancer cases did not meet the Center for Disease Control’s definition of a “cancer cluster” and therefore did not warrant a formal cancer cluster investigation. These and additional findings were detailed in a risk assessment report published in February, 2016, which ultimately found that the potential cancer risk cannot be determined and identified the need for further sampling in response to the carcinogens documented during the investigation.

While none of the Plaintiffs have been diagnosed with cancer at this time, they allege that they face an increased risk of developing cancer or other serious diseases, and suffer from emotional distress, upper respiratory symptoms and infections, migraine headaches, itching
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Massachusetts Appeals Court
Massachusetts Appeals Court

On September 21, 2016, the Massachusetts Appeals Court upheld the grant of summary judgment to Johnson & Johnson (“J&J”), the manufacturer of the Ortho-Evra birth control patch at issue in the case of Niedner v. Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., No. 15-P-1272, 2016 WL 5106479 (Mass. App. Ct. Sept. 21, 2016).  In so doing, the Appeals Court held that J&J had a duty to warn the decedent, but that it adequately did so.

Neidner involved the death of 17-year-old Adrianna Duffy, which resulted from blood clots allegedly caused by the Ortho-Evra birth control patch worn by Ms. Duffy.  Plaintiff claimed that she and Ms. Duffy had not been adequately warned about the increased risk of developing blood clots to those who use the patch.

In June, 2009, Ms. Duffy and her mother met with Ms. Duffy’s doctor to discuss birth control options. Ms. Duffy specifically asked her doctor about the Ortho-Evra patch, as she had previously taken an oral birth control pill but now wanted an easier birth control method. Id. at *1. Ms. Duffy’s doctor prescribed her the patch after this meeting and informed Ms. Duffy and her mother of the risks associated with using the patch, including that of blood clots. The prescription package filled by Ms. Duffy came with an insert from the manufacturer (J&J), as well as a leaflet from the pharmacy at which the prescription was filled, both setting forth the risks associated with the patch, including heart attack, stroke, and blood clots. After approximately three months of use, Ms. Duffy collapsed and died from a massive bilateral pulmonary embolus. Id. at *1.

Ms. Niedner filed suit in October, 2010, alleging, among other things, that her daughter’s death was caused by her use of the patch and that J&J was liable for breach of warranty under the theories of design defect, failure to warn, and manufacturing defect. Id. at *1.  J&J filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that the patch’s risks, including the increased risk of blood clots, were sufficiently disclosed. Id. at *1. A Superior Court judge agreed, allowing the motion, and plaintiff appealed.

Typically, a manufacturer has a duty to warn product users of dangers associated with the reasonably foreseeable use of its product.  Manufacturers of prescription drugs and medical devices are, however, generally excepted from that rule based on the “learned intermediary” rule, which provides that the manufacturer fulfills its duty by providing physicians with an adequate warning about the risks associated with its product. In these instances, the physician acts as the “learned intermediary” between manufacturer and consumer to ensure the patient understands the potential risks and benefits. In MacDonald v. Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp., however, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court created a narrow exception to this rule for the manufacturer of oral contraceptives, which it held has a duty to directly warn not only medical professionals, but also the consumer, about the risks associated with birth control medications. Id. at *2. The Neidner
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