Photo of Christos I. Koutrobis

Christos Koutrobis is an associate with the Complex Litigation Practice Group in MG+M’s Boston, Massachusetts office. He focuses his litigation practice on a variety of complex disputes, ranging from construction litigation to toxic tort liability.

Defendants DCo, LLC (formerly known as Dana Companies) and Ford Motor Company (collectively “Defendants”) recently obtained a defense verdict in an asbestos personal injury matter following a nine day trial that took place in the Western District of Washington. Plaintiffs alleged the decedent, Patrick Jack, developed mesothelioma as a result of exposure to asbestos from products manufactured or supplied by the Defendants. Plaintiff passed away at the age of 81. Specifically, Plaintiffs claim that Mr. Jack was exposed to asbestos: (1) during his childhood and teenage years through his father’s work at Union Pacific; (2) through his own work as a machinist and piping inspector during his service in the U.S. Navy from 1955 to 1962 and 1967 to 1973; and (3) through his own work as an automotive mechanic from 1955 to 2001. Plaintiffs* claimed Mr. Jack was exposed to asbestos through his father’s work clothing. Mr. Jack testified at his deposition that after finishing a day’s work, his father returned home dirty and was routinely greeted by Mr. Jack. Further, Mr. Jack testified at his deposition that he remembered being present as his grandmother shook out his father’s clothes before washing them. On occasion, Mr. Jack accompanied his father to work at Union Pacific and recalled witnessing individuals cut cement pipe and handle insulation. Through his own work, Mr. Jack alleged exposure to asbestos from work with automotive clutches and brakes manufactured by Ford, among others, and automotive gaskets manufactured by Victor (a brand associated with DCo, LLC formerly Dana Companies), among other manufacturers. In April 2017, Plaintiffs brought both common law negligence claims and statutory strict liability claims as enumerated in WASH. REV. CODE 7.72 et seq., in which they alleged defective design and failure to warn against a number of entities, in addition to the Defendants, predominantly associated with Naval vessel equipment. However, because Mr. Jack’s alleged exposure predated the 1986 Washington Tort Reform Act, which established proportionate several liability, the Defendants were subject to the pre-existing law which imposes joint and several liability.

The defendant-equipment manufacturers associated with Mr. Jack’s Naval service were no longer in the case at the time of trial. At trial, Plaintiffs relied on expert testimony of Dr. Carl Brodkin (occupational medicine); Dr. Arnold Brody (cell biology), Dr. Ronald Gordon (pathology; lung fiber burden), and Sean Fitzgerald (geology expert who tested Victor gaskets found in Mr. Jack’s garage). As stated above, because the Plaintiffs’ claims were subject to Washington’s pre-Tort Reform law, mandating joint and several liability with set-offs for prior settlements, only Dana and Ford could be included on the verdict slip. The trial began on October 1, 2018 and both Plaintiffs and Defendants were limited to 24 hours each on the record. After both sides presented their respective cases, the jury began deliberations on October 11, and returned with a verdict the next day. The jury found that neither defendant was strictly liable for allegedly manufacturing and or selling a defective product. However, the jury was not able
Continue Reading Defense Verdict in the Northwest – Jury Rejects Plaintiff’s Asbestos Related Claims in Western District of Washington

Recently, the Texas Court of Appeals (1) upheld a jury’s finding of gross negligence and (2) explained how a trial court should calculate exemplary damages under Texas law, in The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, v. Vicki Lynn Rogers, et al., No. 05-15-00001-CV, 2017 WL 3776837 (Tex. App. Sep. 13, 2017).  In this case, the decedent, Carl Rogers, passed away from mesothelioma.  From 1974 to 2004, he worked as a tire builder at a Goodyear facility in Tyler, Texas, where he allegedly was exposed to asbestos from overhead insulation and from brakes in tire building machines located in the Tyler facility.  Mr. Rogers’ wife (as the representative of his estate) and two daughters sued his employer, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company (“Goodyear”), for wrongful death allegedly caused by Goodyear’s gross negligence.  Typically, workers’ compensation is the exclusive remedy for plaintiffs who attribute the cause of death to the negligence of a decedent’s employer.  However, Texas’ workers’ compensation law allows a plaintiff’s surviving spouse and heirs to recover exemplary damages when the employee’s death resulted from the employer’s gross negligence.

The jury found by clear and convincing evidence that Goodyear’s gross negligence caused Mr. Rogers’ mesothelioma, and ultimately, his death.  To calculate exemplary damages, the trial court asked the jury to determine plaintiffs’ past and future pecuniary loss, past and future loss of companionship and society, and past and future mental anguish.  In addition to making those findings, the jury assessed $15 million in exemplary damages, with 90 percent of the award apportioned to the widow and 5 percent to each daughter.  After the jury’s verdict, the trial court conducted its own calculation of damages according to section 41.008(b) of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code, which lowered the total award to $2,890,000.  On appeal, Goodyear unsuccessfully challenged the jury’s finding of gross negligence, but prevailed in its challenge to the trial court’s calculation of exemplary damages, reducing the total award to $1,150,000.

To prove gross negligence, “a plaintiff must demonstrate, by clear and convincing evidence that: (1) when viewed objectively from the defendant’s standpoint at the time of the event, the act or omission involved an extreme degree of risk, considering the probability and magnitude of the potential harm to others, and (2) the defendant had actual, subjective awareness of the risk involved, but nevertheless proceeded with conscious indifference to the rights, safety, or welfare of others.”  U-Haul Int’l, Inc. v. Waldrip, 380 S.W.3d 118, 137 (Tex. 2012).

The Texas Court of Appeals first addressed the objective component of gross negligence, and described extreme risk as the likelihood of the plaintiff’s serious injury, rather than a remote or even high probability of minor harm.  While Goodyear conceded that mesothelioma is a serious injury, it argued the plaintiffs did not prove the likelihood of that injury.  To support this argument, Goodyear used the plaintiffs’ best evidence regarding dosage, which increased the risk of developing mesothelioma by 22 times over that of someone who was not
Continue Reading Texas Court of Appeals Upholds Jury’s Finding of Gross Negligence While Correcting The Trial Court’s Calculation of Exemplary Damages