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Brian Gross has an exceptional track record of finding client-oriented solutions to complex litigation issues. Drawing on two decades of courtroom experience, he handles a broad spectrum of litigation, including products liability, food and beverage liability claims, asbestos and other toxic tort litigation, pharmaceutical and medical device claims, environmental litigation, as well as trucking claims, general liability issues, and business disputes for clients across the United States. Whether he is trying an individual case or managing national litigation, clients trust Brian to keep their best interests firmly in his sights.

We are all feeling the impact that COVID-19 is having on our lives, both personally and professionally. In an effort to assist our clients as they navigate the myriad of business and legal challenges they are facing during this difficult time, MG+M has prepared a report summarizing the actions taken by state and court systems as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This report contains comprehensive information concerning court orders and individual state’s emergency orders from across the country.  We update this report every day to ensure that our clients have the latest information from all jurisdictions. Please click here to request a copy of this report.

We will also continue to post blog articles regarding various legal topics, including how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the legal system and various areas of the law.  Please watch for articles on these topics during the next few weeks as we hope they will help you better understand how this pandemic may impact legal issues related to your business.

Stay safe and healthy.

 
Continue Reading MG+M’s Resources Related to COVID-19

Overview

On March 30, 2018, Judge Rya Zobel of the United States District Court (District of Massachusetts) issued a memorandum of decision on two Defendants’ (NSTAR Electric, formerly Boston Edison, and General Electric) Motions for Summary Judgment in an asbestos personal injury and wrongful death matter, June Stearns and Clifford Stearns as Co-Executors of the Estate of Wayne Oliver v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., et al., that addresses multiple issues, including statute of repose, strict liability and liability of a premises owner.

Background

Plaintiff’s decedent, Wayne Oliver, worked on the construction of two power plants, Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Massachusetts) and Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Maryland), between 1971 and 1978 and his estate alleges that Mr. Oliver was exposed to asbestos-containing products present at those sites. Defendant NSTAR Electric (formerly Boston Edison)(“Boston Edison”) owned the Pilgrim premises.  Defendant General Electric (“GE”) allegedly designed, manufactured, and sold generators used at Pilgrim and at Calvert Cliffs.  Oliver worked as a pipe inspector for Bechtel, the architect-engineer on projects at both Pilgrim and Calvert Cliffs.

As the owner of Pilgrim, Boston Edison conducted safety audits while the construction proceeded, but primary responsibility for the site construction rested with GE and Bechtel: GE for the steam supply system, nuclear fuel system, and the generators themselves; and Bechtel for everything else. In that capacity, Bechtel hired and supervised all subcontractors on the project, including an insulation installer, New England Insulation (“NEI”). Although NEI reported to Bechtel, it installed the asbestos-containing insulation around the generators pursuant to directions from both Bechtel and GE, and pursuant to GE’s specifications that specifically required asbestos-containing insulation.  The Court also recognized that at both Pilgrim and at Calvert Cliffs, GE had rejected suggestions or proposals for an asbestos-free insulation alternative.

Oliver allegedly sustained exposure to asbestos at both sites while inspecting pipe near dusty thermal insulation as other subcontractors installed it around the generators. He was subsequently diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2015 and died in 2016.  In denying summary judgment to GE and granting summary judgment to Boston Edison, the Court found that:  (1) while the construction work performed by GE met the definition of an improvement to real property for purposes of the statute of repose, public policy considerations necessitated an exception to the application of the statute in cases involving alleged asbestos-related disease; (2) the installation of asbestos insulation was not an abnormally dangerous activity; (3) Boston Edison did not exercise sufficient control over the work at issue to be held negligent; and (4) a premises owner, such as Boston Edison, has no duty to warn where the subcontractor has knowledge of the hazard which is equal to or greater than that of the premises owner.

Application of Statute of Repose

GE argued protection from Plaintiffs’ claims under Massachusetts’s six-year statute of repose, which bars claims concerning “improvements to real property.” Under Massachusetts law, this involves a “permanent addition” versus “ordinary repair.” Whether this statute applied to asbestos claims against manufacturers posed an
Continue Reading Summary Judgment Order Illuminates Issues in MA Asbestos Litigation

Recently, in Sawyer v. Foster Wheeler LLC, the Fourth Circuit held that a government contractor is entitled to federal jurisdiction, even in product liability failure-to-warn actions, based on the contractor’s assertion that it has a colorable federal defense of government contractor immunity. 860 F.3d 249 (4th Cir. 2017). The big takeaway from this case, however, is that the Fourth Circuit has now joined the Second, Third, Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth Circuits in holding that a government contractor need not demonstrate that it attempted to provide a warning, but was prohibited from doing so by the government. Id.; see Cuomo v. Crane Co., 771 F.3d 113 (2nd Cir. 2014); Papp v. Fore-Kast Sales Co., Inc., 842 F.3d 805 (3d Cir. 2016); Zeringue v. Crane Company, 846 F.3d 785 (5th Cir. 2017); Ruppel v. CBS Corp., 701 F.3d 1176 (7th Cir. 2012); Leite v. Crane Co., 749 F.3d 1117 (9th Cir. 2014). Instead, for the government contractor defense to apply, the contractor is only required to establish that the government dictated or approved the warnings the contractor actually provided.

Sawyer involved the claims of a decedent’s family against Foster Wheeler LLC in Maryland state court, in which they alleged that the decedent’s death was caused by exposure to asbestos while he assembled Foster Wheeler boilers for use aboard Navy vessels in the boiler shop of the Sparrows Point Shipyard, and that the defendants failed to warn him of the dangers associated with asbestos exposure. Sawyer, 860 F.3d at 249. Foster Wheeler removed the case to federal district court based on federal officer jurisdiction conferred as a result of its government contractor defense. Following plaintiffs’ motion, the district court remanded the case and Foster Wheeler appealed. Id.

In support of federal officer jurisdiction, Foster Wheeler asserted that it manufactured boilers for the Navy under the Navy’s strict specifications and that “in the manufacture and sale of boilers and auxiliary equipment for the Navy, including all aspects of warnings associated with that equipment, [it] was acting under an officer or agency of the United States.” Id. In support, Foster Wheeler supplied the affidavits of a former employee and a retired Navy captain, in which they attested: (1) Foster Wheeler designed boilers to match highly detailed ship and military specifications provided by the Navy, that “deviations from these specifications were not acceptable,” and the Navy exercised “intense direction and control over all written documentation to be delivered with its naval boilers;” and (2) “the Navy was well aware of the health hazards associated with the use of asbestos from the early 1920s,” and that the Navy’s information “with respect to the specification and use of asbestos, and the health hazards associated with its use aboard Navy vessels, far exceeded any information that possibly could have been provided by a boiler manufacturer.” Id.

The Plaintiffs argued: (1) that the government contractor defense does not apply to failure-to-warn actions; and (2) the boilers were not constructed
Continue Reading Fourth Circuit Joins Unanimous Federal Circuits – No Requirement That Government Prohibit Contractor From Warning About Asbestos For Government Contractor Defense To Apply

Lady JusticeEver since the United States Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Daimler A.G. v. Bauman, 134 S. Ct. 746 (2014), in which the Court held that general personal jurisdiction exists over a corporation only where the corporation is fairly regarded as “at home,” many plaintiffs and state courts have attempted to distinguish Daimler in an effort to expand the boundaries of a court’s exercise of personal jurisdiction. It should come as no surprise then that the U.S. Supreme Court, with five personal jurisdiction cases before it and its Daimler decision seemingly under attack, ultimately decided to grant review of two such cases in 2017: BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell, and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. The Superior Court of San Francisco County, which attack the Daimler holding from very different perspectives.

As you may recall from your first year law school basics, personal jurisdiction requires, among other things, that the “the defendant’s conduct and connection with the forum state are such that he should reasonably anticipate being haled into court there.” World-Wide Volkswagen Corp. v. Woodson, 444 U.S. 286, 297 (1980).  This can be established through either specific jurisdiction, where the defendant has sufficient contacts with the forum state which directly relate to the underlying controversy, or general jurisdiction, where “the [ defendant’s] affiliations with the [forum s]tate are so ‘continuous and systematic’ as to render them essentially at home in the forum [s]tate.” Daimler, 134 S. Ct. at 748-49, 760.

BNSF Railway, begs the question as to whether a state court may decline to follow the Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler, as The Montana Supreme Court directly challenged the limitations on general personal jurisdiction established by the Daimler Court. It did so by holding that the Federal Employers Liability Act (“FELA”) essentially creates an exception to the “at home” requirements of Daimler.  The plaintiffs in BNSF Railway are two employees who seek damages from the company pursuant to FELA, which provides railroad employees with a federal cause of action for personal injuries caused by their employer’s negligence. Neither plaintiff resides in Montana, nor did the injuries occur in Montana. Yet, plaintiffs brought suit in Montana. Under Daimler, BNSF should not have been considered “at home” in Montana, as it is incorporated in Delaware and has its principal place of business in Texas. Despite these facts, the Montana Supreme Court held that Montana courts could exercise general jurisdiction over BNSF.  The Montana Supreme Court reasoned that Section 56 of FELA allows a plaintiff to bring suit in any federal district court in which the defendant does business, and also confers concurrent jurisdiction over FELA suits to state courts. As such, the Court reasoned that state courts should have general jurisdiction in FELA matters over defendants in any state in which the defendant did business.  Tyrrell v. BNSF Ry. Co., 373 P.3d 1 (Mont. 2016).

As previously reported, in Bristol-Myers Squibb the California Supreme Court took a different approach to challenging the limits of the exercise of personal jurisdiction. 
Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court to Weigh In on Personal Jurisdiction as State Courts Have Gone Rogue

California Supreme Court
California Supreme Court

The United States Supreme Court’s decision in Daimler A.G. v. Bauman, 571 U.S. __, 134 S.Ct. 746 (2014), has played a significant role this year in cases pending in Delaware and Rhode Island. Most recently, the California Supreme Court has weighed in, changing what we thought we knew about personal jurisdiction, at least in California.

In Daimler, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a court can exercise general jurisdiction (whereby a state court asserts jurisdiction over a defendant on claims unrelated to the defendant’s activities in the forum state) only when the defendant can be said to be “at home” in the forum – the paradigm being the state in which it is incorporated or has its principal place of business. The California Supreme Court has now found a way to turn that decision on its head. It held in Bristol-Meyers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court, 377 P.3d 874 (Cal. 2016) that plaintiffs from outside California whose claims do not arise out of anything involving California can sue a non-California defendant in a California court.

Bristol-Myers argued, pursuant to Daimler, that it was not subject to personal jurisdiction in the California courts for the suits of 592 non-California plaintiffs. First of all, it argued that it was not subject to specific personal jurisdiction because none of the 592 lawsuits by non-California plaintiffs arose out of anything plaintiff or defendant did in California. Moreover, it argued that it was not subject to general personal jurisdiction because it was not “at home” in California, based on the fact that it was neither headquartered nor incorporated in California.

The California Supreme Court agreed that there was no basis for the exercise of general jurisdiction, but instead found that a “new wave” specific jurisdiction existed because Bristol-Myers engaged in “nationwide marketing, promotion and distribution [that] created a substantial nexus between the non-resident plaintiffs’ claims and the company’s contacts in California . . . .” And, according to the Bristol-Meyers court, the more wide-ranging the defendant’s forum contacts, the more readily a “connection” between the defendant’s forum contacts and the claims by the non-resident plaintiffs can be found.

This decision of the California Supreme Court appears to basically moot the Daimler decision and may make any company that does business nationally subject to personal jurisdiction in California. Bristol-Meyers has filed a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court, so this decision may have a short shelf life. For the time being, however, companies should be prepared to litigate in California, as the Bristol-Meyers decision is likely to factor into plaintiffs’ decision when choosing a forum in which to litigate.
Continue Reading CA Supreme Court Offers Interpretation of Personal Jurisdiction Decision