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Andrew Wellman is an associate at MG+M’s Irvine, California office. His practice focuses primarily on toxic tort liability, premises liability, general liability, and employment litigation. Prior to joining MG+M, Andrew was an associate at a law firm in Orange County, CA that specialized in complex business litigation

In our 240+ year history as a country, we have endured numerous tribulations that have in some way, threatened our way of life. The COVID-19 outbreak has forced us to engage in new behaviors, including social distancing and the consistent use of face masks outside of our homes. Moreover, several companies are working tirelessly to develop potential treatments for a virus that has infected approximately 1.25 million Americans and killed approximately 75,670.[1] Among other efforts, entities are repurposing equipment and physicians are prescribing medication for “off-label use.” Surgeon General Jerome Adams has even gone so far as to compare the COVID-19 outbreak to national emergencies like Pearl Harbor and the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center.

Indispensable to facing these challenges are private-sector entities. World War II is an excellent example, during which President Franklin Roosevelt declared, “[p]owerful enemies must be out-fought and out-produced.” Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, many manufacturers were repurposed to manufacture war items such as aircraft, aircraft engines, trucks, and tanks. Though a pandemic is certainly different than a war, several companies have altered their normal courses of business to help contribute towards the collective fight against COVID-19. Today, the businesses supporting efforts to curb COVID-19 include pharmaceutical companies, medical device companies, medical technology companies, and more. Despite their good faith contributions, which include activities such as repurposing equipment and medication for “off-label” use, these companies will almost certainly face litigation related to the products they have manufactured in an effort to combat the crisis we face today. Nonetheless, companies may be insulated from liability pursuant to the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (“PREP”), if they meet certain criteria.

PREP, signed into law in 2005, authorizes the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to issue a declaration that provides immunity from liability for entities and/or individuals involved in the development of “countermeasures” meant to fight a public health emergency. On March 10, 2020, the HHS issued a declaration providing “liability immunity for activities related to medical countermeasures against COVID-19,” absent willful misconduct (“COVID-19 Declaration”). Entities/individuals covered under the COVID-19 Declaration (“Covered Persons”) include those involved in the following activities: manufacturing, testing, development, distribution, administration, prescription and/or use of “Covered Countermeasures.”[2]

“Covered Countermeasures” under the COVID-19 Declaration

Certain products fall under the “Covered Countermeasures” category. Covered Countermeasures include:

  1. Qualified pandemic or epidemic products;
  2. Security countermeasures[3]; or
  3. Drugs/products authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).

Qualified Pandemic or Epidemic Products

To qualify as a qualified pandemic or epidemic product, the drug, device, or biological product must be approved or cleared by the FDA, licensed under Section 351 (42 U.S.C. § 262) of the Public Health Services Act (“PHS Act”) as a biological product, or authorized for emergency use by the FDA.

In addition to the one of the foregoing prerequisites, the drug, device, or biological product must be:

  1. Manufactured, used, designed, developed, modified, licensed or procured to diagnose, mitigate, prevent, treat, or cure


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