From television to transportation services, it seems that everywhere we look, people are seeking increased diversity. We want to see every race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, and socioeconomic background represented in every industry. It has been proven that diversity can be a driver of economic growth, but what about the legal profession? Do clients benefit from diversity within their law firms?

While it may appear biased coming from a female minority, I believe all signs point to yes. Law firms with diverse workforces have unique advantages difficult to attain through any other means. The following lists just some of those advantages:

Stronger Firm

  • Let’s start off with the obvious: law firms benefit from diversity in the same way any other business does. A diverse work environment is more likely to result in greater acceptance of its employees, which results in a happier work environment, which leads to lower turnover. These are all positives for clients when it comes to the bottom line because decreasing ‘the churn’ promotes efficiency; fewer attorneys and staff will work on a client’s matters over a longer period of time. Moreover, happy employees are proven to be more productive.

Diversity Produces Better Quality Work

  • I was raised in a Mexican-American household. We spoke Spanglish at home and ate Mexican food four out of five nights. As a child, I believed this to be the ‘normal’ American life. However, through my friendships with people that did not share my culture, I came to realize there were many other languages being spoken and delicious meals being enjoyed by families around the country. My perception of what an American family looks like expanded. In a way, the career of an attorney is not much different. Attorneys from different backgrounds each provide a unique perspective and approach to the law. When an attorney has the opportunity to work with a diverse group, they are able to expand their perspective on the key issues of a case and are thus in a better position to determine the best approach. The attorneys benefit, as do the clients.

Larger NetworkDiversity in Legal Services

  • Clients look to their attorneys for more than just legal advice, often times seeking referrals in other fields or jurisdictions. It is easy to see why law firms with attorneys practicing in various states and practice areas from various backgrounds can be beneficial to clients given the large network of connections the firm creates. Even within the same city, law firms with employees from assorted backgrounds are more likely to have a larger network, often through involvement in organizations or associations.

Greater Capability

  • Let’s not overlook language. A firm with a multilingual workforce has the capability to assist clients in unique circumstances. It is not uncommon for attorneys to meet with witnesses who speak other languages. Legal documents often need to be translated or drafted in another language. Moreover, in the event a client has international business, working with attorneys with citizenship in other countries can also be


Continue Reading Why You Should Seek Diversity in Your Law Firm

The Garlock asbestos bankruptcy has generated significant interest from attorneys representing plaintiffs and defendants as well as from companies and insurers involved in asbestos litigation.  Although the impact on litigation throughout the country has been uneven, courts seem to be more willing to take a proactive role in ensuring that transparency is provided in disclosing information related to bankruptcy trust claims.

In the meantime, the allegations of potential withholding of alternative exposure evidence seems to have contributed to Garlock’s agreement with future asbestos claimants.  The company recently announced a $358 million settlement of all asbestos injury claims and a revised reorganization plan.

The new agreement, while representing nearly double the $125 million a bankruptcy judge had estimated as Garlock’s liability is significantly lower than the $1 billion plaintiffs’ lawyers were requesting from Garlock.

Consequently, if the Garlock reorganization plan is approved, other companies may find asbestos bankruptcy more feasible than previously.

Additionally, as Daniel Fisher, writing for Forbes notes, other companies and insurers with potential asbestos liability are expected to continue to monitor the Garlock decision and seek to use files emerging from the case to help dispute claims that the companies or insureds’ products were the primary cause of plaintiffs’ illnesses in litigation or to show that plaintiffs may have made conflicting claims against other companies.

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Continue Reading Will “Unprecedented” Garlock Asbestos Bankruptcy Deal Be a Game Changer?

A deadly Listeria outbreak has swept across the United States in recent weeks, sickening at least 29 people and taking the lives of three.  This latest tragedy is reportedly linked to the sale of commercially produced, prepackaged caramelized apples. If recent media reports are accurate, the situation highlights the devastation a single breach in sanitation protocol can thrust on an otherwise remarkable wholesale and retail food distribution system in the United States. The situation also serves to remind food growers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers alike that exposure to liability for food-borne illnesses today goes well beyond civil fines and damages and is increasingly subject to criminal prosecution.

Listeria outbreaks are rare but dangerous. In 2011, listeria in cantaloupes killed 33 people and sickened 147 in 28 states, according to the CDC. In 2012, 22 people were infected and four died in an outbreak attributed to a brand of ricotta cheese imported from Italy. Besides the potential civil suits, one of which has already been filed in connection with the caramel apple outbreak (James Raymond Frey, Individually and on behalf of the Estate of Shirlee Jean Frey, et al. v. Safeway, Inc., et al., No. CISCV180721 (Cal. Sup. Santa Cruz Co.)), food manufacturers should be aware of the unprecedented criminal prosecutions of food-industry defendants in multiple states.

In 2010 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began warning the food industry, that federal criminal laws would be enforced in the fooded safety industry, including the potential liability for food industry executives for the shipment of contaminated food, even though it was outside of the executive’s knowledge or consent. In light of the strict liability laws, U.S. v. Eric Jensen and Ryan Jensen resulted in Colorado’s Jensen brothers each serving  six months of home confinement in 2014 after pleading guilty to six of the “strict liability” federal criminal misdemeanors. The only evidence necessary was that the company distributed cantaloupes with the deadly pathogen; knowledge of the contamination was irrelevant.

Similarly, in United States v. Parnell, No. 13-cr-12 (U.S. Dist. Ct., M.D. Ga., Albany Div.) the food company employees are awaiting sentencing for “strict liability” misdemeanors because their contaminated eggs became part of interstate commerce. In addition, the recent jury trial and conviction of former Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) officers and managers has captured the attention of the entire food industry.

Most recently, criminal charges have been brought against the owners and employees of a pharmaceutical company linked to the deadly 2012 meningitis outbreak. Two of the fourteen arrested were the owners of the company, each of whom were charged with second-degree murder and racketeering in connection with the 64 deaths that resulted from the outbreak. The 131 count indictment alleges that the employees were aware that they were producing medication in an unsafe and unsanitary manner, yet distributed it anyway.

Although the requisite knowledge standard of those involved with the meningitis outbreak differs from the strict liability standard for those in connection with the listeria outbreak,
Continue Reading New Era of Criminal Prosecution For Those in the Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Industry

Ben Franklin famously warned that “you may delay, but time will not, and lost time is never found again.” These words of wisdom appear to be lost on the Illinois state legislature, which recently abolished the ten-year statute of repose for personal injury claims related to asbestos exposure under 735 ILCS 5/13-214. Far from an esoteric legal issue, the amendment has become the front line in the latest battle of the national divide on the issue of tort reform. Some have warned that the Madison County Illinois asbestos docket, already one of the busiest and most plaintiff friendly in the country, will see a wave of new litigation from plaintiffs who missed the deadline to bring suit. The change to the statute however, may not be the seismic shift that some have forecast.

The statute in question, commonly known as the “construction statute,” previously held that “no action based upon tort…may be brought against any person for an act or omission of such person in the design, planning, supervision, observation or management of construction, or construction of an improvement to real property after 10 years have elapsed from the time of such act or omission.” The amendment adds a subsection which reads that the limitation does not apply to “an action that is based on personal injury…resulting from the discharge into the environment of asbestos.”

This legislative action hasn’t abolished the statute of limitations in all asbestos-related claims. It has only abolished the ten-year statute of repose for claims that fall under the limited ambit of the construction statute. In other words, defendants who are commonly named in asbestos suits won’t likely see a sizeable increase in claims unless they are also involved in the construction industry.

For those who previously fell under the protection of the statute, however, the change could be as dramatic as advertised. Given the long latency period for many asbestos-related diseases, contractors, engineers and architects were often immune from suit, as some persons exposed to asbestos on a given job site may not discover their condition until well after the 10 year statute of repose had expired. With the amendment, these Defendants may find themselves named in lawsuits as often as manufacturers of asbestos-containing products.  Fortunately for them, many cases filed in Madison County arise out of exposures from other states, and in those cases, the statute will not likely apply.

Consistent with the abolition of the statute of repose, the state also recently passed a law reducing civil juries from twelve to six members. This is a shift which generally favors Plaintiffs as smaller groups are more likely to be influenced by emotion or a strong personality in the jury room.

Embedded is a link to the American Tort Reform Foundation Judicial Hellholes® Listing.  We’ll be watching to see where Illinois falls on the next list.
Continue Reading Not Satisfied with its 5th Place Finish in the American Tort Reform Foundation Judicial Hellholes® Listing, Illinois Makes A Push For Number One

The parents of Joshua Kaye, an 8 year-old boy from Braintree, Massachusetts who died on July 7, 2014, after contracting an E. coli 0157:H7 infection that turned into hemolytic uremic syndrome, have filed suit against Whole Foods, the retail store from which they allege to have purchased the contaminated meat, and Rain Crow Ranch, a Missouri company that allegedly produced and sold the meat to Whole Foods. Joshua Kaye was one of three Massachusetts residents known to contract E. coli between June 13 and June 25, 2014, prompting an investigation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (“FSIS”), in conjunction with the Center for Disease and Control Prevention (“CDC”) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. FSIS, which began its investigation on June 25, 2014, purportedly initially linked the E. coli contamination to Whole Foods stores in Newton and South Weymouth, Massachusetts, through epidemiological evidence. FSIS reports that laboratory testing performed on August 13, 2014, presumably Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis (“PFGE”), provided a link between the three Massachusetts cases and the Whole Foods markets. On August 15, 2014, Whole Foods initiated the voluntary recall of 368 pounds of ground beef products from its two stores.

Joshua Kaye’s father, Andrew Kaye, told New England Cable News (“NECN”) that DNA samples had linked their son to the E. coli outbreak. Furthermore, Plaintiffs’ Complaint asserts that a stool sample taken from Joshua Kaye resulted in an E. coli 0157:H7 positive culture that “identically matched the Whole Foods Market E. coli 0157:H7 outbreak strain.” Both Whole Foods and Rain Crow Ranch have denied any clear link between the Massachusetts E. coli illnesses and their respective businesses.

Plaintiffs have asserted claims against Whole Foods for: (1) Breach of Implied Warranty of Merchantability; (2) Breach of Warranty in Violation of M.G.L. ch. 93A; (3) Breach of M.G.L. ch. 93A; (4) Negligence; (5) Gross Negligence and Reckless Conduct; (6) Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress; (7) Conscious Pain and Suffering; (8) Wrongful Death; and (9) Punitive Damages.

What Does It Mean for Whole Foods? As a non-manufacturing product seller, Whole Foods appears to have pass-through liability for the sale of contaminated beef. On that basis, we expect Whole Foods to tender the defense and indemnification of their claim to Rain Crow Ranch. Whole Foods’ success in getting their tender accepted, however, will depend upon the terms of their contract with Rain Crow Ranch for the purchase of ground beef, as well as their role, if any, in the production process in advance of sale. For instance, if Whole Foods’ handling or processing of the subject beef caused or contributed to the alleged E. coli contamination, its independent negligence would preclude a common law indemnification claim and potentially impede a claim for contractual indemnity.

Further, Whole Foods’ tender will be complicated, by Plaintiffs’ assertion of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 93A claims (“93A”). 93A provides a cause of action for unfair or deceptive practices in the conduct of any trade or commerce. Entities found
Continue Reading Whole Foods Faces Tremendous Risk In Connection With The Death of an 8 Year-Old From E. Coli 0157:H7 Infection