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Rhode Island Jury Reinforces the Need for Adequate Warnings

Posted in Premises Liability, Rhode Island Courts

In a recent case, a Rhode Island Jury awarded $31.3 million to Brett and Stacie Smith after a 2014 swimming accident in a pond at the University of Rhode Island left Mr. Smith paralyzed from the chest down.  The jury found that the University of Rhode Island was negligent in its failure to post warning signs and to inform its guests that swimming was prohibited.

 

The Smiths were attending a wedding during the weekend of July 25, 2014, at the Whispering Pines Conference Center.  After the rehearsal dinner, several members of the wedding party decided to go swimming in Louttit Pond.  After twenty or so minutes in the water, Mr. Smith and some others swam to, and climbed atop, a large rock in the middle of the pond.  They dove off and began to swim away from the rock.  While swimming underwater, Mr. Smith struck his head on a submerged rock, causing his paralysis.

 

The case focused on whether the defendants owed Mr. Smith a duty of care.  The plaintiffs argued that a duty existed for the defendants to post warning signs indicating that swimming was not allowed or describing the potential danger.  Conversely, the defendants argued that no duty existed as Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries and that the potential dangers were open and obvious.

 

At trial, the major issue primarily focused on whether it was reasonably foreseeable that individuals would swim and be injured in the subject pond.  The plaintiffs put forth evidence that the management of the property had outlawed swimming in the pond due to potentially dangerous conditions, but did not install signs that forbade swimming on the property or warned of the dangers that the pond possessed.   The plaintiffs argued that this failure constituted negligence, as it was foreseeable that: 1) people would swim in the pond; 2) the very nature of the property lent itself to swimming as it promoted access to the outdoors, specifically, the water as well as numerous outdoor activities; and 3) the pond had a dock and a canoe launching point which encouraged people to use the water.

 

The defendants asserted two main defenses: 1) Mr. Smith assumed the risk of his injuries; 2) the condition was open and obvious. In Rhode Island, assumption of the risk is an affirmative defense that absolves a defendant of liability regardless of the defendant’s own negligence.  Loffredo v. Merrimack Mutual Fire Ins. Co., 669 A.2d 1162 (R.I. 1996).  To prevail on the assumption of the risk defense, defendants need to show that a plaintiff voluntarily encountered an unreasonable risk and appreciated its unreasonable character.  Id.  In examining this subjective standard, one must look at what the particular plaintiff saw, knew, understood, and appreciated.  Id.  As for the open-and-obvious defense, a property owner in Rhode Island is not liable for injuries that a guest suffered while on an owner’s premises when that guest was engaging in an open and obvious danger. Bucki v. Hawkins, 914 A.2d 491, 496 (R.I. 2007).

 

In an attempt to establish these defenses, the defendants endeavored to elicit testimony from Mr. Smith that he was aware of the potential dangers associated with swimming in an unfamiliar body of water.  The goal was to demonstrate that he assumed the risk of his injuries, as he knew it was possible that he might strike his head on an underwater obstacle.  Additionally, the defendants argued that the dangers associated with swimming in an unknown body of water should be open and obvious to the reasonable person.  In particular, they asserted that a reasonable person is well aware of the dangers associated with diving into shallow water or with swimming in an unfamiliar body of water.

 

At the conclusion of a three-week trial, the jury rejected both defenses.  In particular, the jury found Mr. Smith did not assume the risk of his injuries as the pond was deep, the submerged rocks were not visible, and he saw other swimmers in the group safely emerge after traversing the water. For similar reasons, the jury concluded that the dangers, as described, were not open and obvious.

 

This case once again reinforces an important reminder to property owners in Rhode Island: it is imperative to warn of known dangers, no matter how unlikely they are to be encountered or how open or obvious the condition may seem to be.