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Johnson & Johnson Found Not Responsible in Los Angeles Superior Court

Posted in Asbestos Litigation, California Courts

In the first case of its kind to go to trial, a jury recently returned a defense verdict against a plaintiff who claimed that exposure to Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder caused her to develop mesothelioma.

The plaintiff, Tina Herford, filed suit in the Los Angeles County Superior Court and alleged that her exposure to asbestiform fibers, through the inhalation of Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder, caused her to develop mesothelioma. In seeking 24 million dollars in damages, Ms. Herford alleged that Johnson & Johnson was aware that its talcum-based products, and specifically its baby powder, were contaminated with asbestos, and that the company concealed this information from the public for approximately 100 years.

Johnson & Johnson presented expert testimony from an oncologist that the proximate cause of Ms. Herford’s mesothelioma was her exposure to radiation from treatments for an unrelated, prior cancer. Johnson & Johnson also denied that its talcum-based products ever contained talc contaminated with asbestos, and stated that Johnson & Johnson complies fully with FDA regulations and standards regarding its baby powder and other products, as well as industry standards established by the Personal Care Products Council (formerly the Cosmetic Toiletries Fragrance Association) for testing crude talc.

After two days of deliberations following a trial that lasted approximately four weeks, a Pasadena, CA jury returned with a verdict for Johnson & Johnson and its co-defendant, Imerys Talc America Inc. The jury rejected the Plaintiffs’ allegations that Imerys had supplied and that Johnson & Johnson sold talc which was contaminated with asbestos. The jury found that J&J did not negligently design or sell its talc products, that the talc product did not fail to perform as safely as a reasonable consumer would have expected, that the talc product was not defective, and that Johnson & Johnson did not fail to warn of any potential risks, “known or knowable based on general scientific knowledge at time of sale.”  As a result, the jury never reached the issue of causation.

The Herford verdict comes in the wake of two rulings which reversed plaintiff verdicts in cases in which plaintiffs had alleged that Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder had caused ovarian cancer: Echeverria v. Johnson & Johnson, JCCP4872, Superior Court of Los Angeles, in which a $417M verdict was overturned; and Fox v. Johnson & Johnson, ED104580, Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District, where a $72-million verdict against Johnson & Johnson was thrown out.

There are currently more than 5,500 talc-related claims pending in state and federal courts in multiple jurisdictions throughout the United States. The Herford verdict is a reminder that reliable scientific evidence and facts, rather than rumors and rushed judgment, should decide these cases.