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Why a Wisconsin Judge Rejected an Asbestos Case as “Disingenuous”

Posted in Asbestos Litigation, Toxic Tort
KastenmeierUSCT_Madison_WI_exterior_941675052106904545_1435163225376

Robert W. Kastenmeier United States Courthouse Madison, WI

A district court judge for the Western District of Wisconsin has issued a defense-verdict following a three-day bench trial, during which Plaintiff argued that his father’s work with Kaylo pipe insulation caused his death from mesothelioma. In his opinion in Gary Suoja, Individually and as Special Administrator of the Estate of Oswald Suoja v. Owens-Illinois, Inc., Magistrate Judge Stephen Crocker found that Plaintiff failed to meet his burden of showing that exposure to Kaylo was a substantial cause of Mr. Suoja’s mesothelioma. Though ultimately decided on the basis of pretrial motions that precluded the testimony offered by Plaintiff’s causation expert, Judge Crocker discussed Plaintiff’s failure to incorporate evidence of alternative exposures, stating that ignoring such evidence when arguing cumulative exposure was “disingenuous” on the part of the Plaintiff.

The current matter was filed on behalf of the Estate of Gary Suoja against numerous companies, only one of which—Owens-Illinois—remained at trial. Mr. Suoja worked as a union asbestos worker for 40 years, beginning in 1944. Throughout the course of the lawsuit, the Estate argued that Mr. Suoja’s lengthy career as an asbestos worker caused him to work with and around numerous asbestos-containing products; however, evidence of these exposures was noticeably absent from trial.

In order to establish the causation element of his negligence and strict liability claims, Plaintiff offered only the testimony of Dr. Frank. Dr. Frank’s position was that Mr. Suoja’s cumulative exposure to asbestos from working with Kaylo, manufactured by Owens-Illinois, caused his mesothelioma. When presenting his cumulative exposure theory, Dr. Frank took the position that any asbestos exposure, “no matter how slight, no matter how minimal” is a part of an individual’s cumulative exposure and thus a cause of resulting disease. Dr. Frank offered this opinion only in relation to Mr. Suoja’s limited work with Kaylo insulation; he did not offer any opinion about the amount of asbestos from Kaylo to which Mr. Suoja was exposed, nor did he compare the amount of Mr. Suoja’s Kaylo exposure to Mr. Suoja’s cumulative exposure to asbestos from the numerous other products he worked with over the course of his 40-year career.

Plaintiff took the position that Mr. Suoja’s admissions of other exposures were largely irrelevant, arguing that most were simply assertions of exposure without any information regarding the dosage level at which Mr. Suoja was exposed. Plaintiff further argued that if Owens-Illinois wanted to attack Dr. Frank’s causation opinion on the ground that he failed to account for other exposures, then it was defendant’s burden to establish that these alternative exposures were substantial in nature.

Judge Crocker addressed Plaintiff’s argument, calling it “unpersuasive” and stating that “[i]t is disingenuous for plaintiff to have obtained recovery from numerous bankruptcy trusts and asbestos manufacturers based upon sworn admissions of asbestos exposure and then to brush aside those admissions as irrelevant to causation in this lawsuit.” Plaintiff’s lawsuit against Owens-Illinois was ultimately dismissed for failure to establish both exposure and causation.

About the Author

Katherine Vogelhuber is an associate in the firm’s products liability and complex tort practice, where she concentrates on products liability defense and litigation management for a number of the firm’s national clients. Kate is admitted to practice in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the State of Illinois. In 2007, Kate received her Bachelor of Arts from Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York. She received her J.D. from DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, Illinois in 2012.